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    #1

    come off

    Which is correct?

    He comes off as arrogant.

    He comes off arrogant.

    Thanks.


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
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    #2

    Re: come off

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    Which is correct?

    He comes off as arrogant.

    He comes off arrogant.

    Thanks.
    "He comes off as arrogant" is the best form of this phrase -- which is not quite standard English in the first place (so assigning rules for it to follow is problematic.)

    The second sentence may be used dialectically, as slangy speech

    "Man, that Jarred he come off arrogant, you know? and like all proud and sh**"
    Last edited by Ann1977; 17-Sep-2009 at 01:29.


    • Join Date: May 2008
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    #3

    Re: come off

    Hello.

    Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary
    come off
    to seem to have a specified quality or character usually + as
    ▪ He's really just shy, but he comes off as a little arrogant. [=he seems a little arrogant]
    ▪ He came off as a stuffy old man.

    Don't some people usually use "as"?

    Thank you.


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    #4

    Re: come off

    Yes, I suppose people do usually use "as."

    The issue, however, is that this colloquialism is highly likely to be used by people who are not speaking standard English in the first place, so there is a high incidence of this phrase being used "ungrammatically" (if such an idea can even apply to such non-standard English in the first place.)

    One time my little godson asked a little girl for some of her candy (which was all gone.)

    The little girl replied:
    "Ain guss none" meaning "( I ) ain't gots none."

    But what is the point really of complaining that she didn't pronounce "ain't" correctly, or that "guss" is not the way to say "gots"?

    These words are already so wrong in the first place that it's ridiculous to make them conform to rules.

    Should I have reminded her that she is "supposed to" pronounce "ain" as "ain't"? She isn't SUPPOSED to pronounce "ain't" any way at all.

    And the problem with "guss" goes much deeper than the fact that it is the wrong way to pronounce "gots" --"gots" itself is wrong on so many levels that it just doesn't matter how she pronounces it.

    So, yes, educated speakers who use the expression "come off" do say "comes off as."

    But this expression is used more often by uneducated speakers than by educated ones, so in the end, it is very often heard (in actual practice, in reality) without the "as."

  1. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: come off

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    Yes, I suppose people do usually use "as."

    The issue, however, is that this colloquialism is highly likely to be used by people who are not speaking standard English in the first place, so there is a high incidence of this phrase being used "ungrammatically" (if such an idea can even apply to such non-standard English in the first place.)

    One time my little godson asked a little girl for some of her candy (which was all gone.)

    The little girl replied:
    "Ain guss none" meaning "( I ) ain't gots none."

    But what is the point really of complaining that she didn't pronounce "ain't" correctly, or that "guss" is not the way to say "gots"?

    These words are already so wrong in the first place that it's ridiculous to make them conform to rules.

    Should I have reminded her that she is "supposed to" pronounce "ain" as "ain't"? She isn't SUPPOSED to pronounce "ain't" any way at all.

    And the problem with "guss" goes much deeper than the fact that it is the wrong way to pronounce "gots" --"gots" itself is wrong on so many levels that it just doesn't matter how she pronounces it.

    So, yes, educated speakers who use the expression "come off" do say "comes off as."

    But this expression is used more often by uneducated speakers than by educated ones, so in the end, it is very often heard (in actual practice, in reality) without the "as."
    I don't find the phrasal verb here particularly informal or vernacular.


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    #6

    Re: come off

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    I don't find the phrasal verb here particularly informal or vernacular.
    I think the expression "comes off" is getting more of a ride than it should be entitled to because it is such a nifty way to refer to something that otherwise is hard to express.

    Yet I still think that a grave or formal piece of writing would not ever say,
    "The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court comes off as a wicked neat guy."

    I think the editor would pretty much automatically alter that to
    "The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court is unaffected and natural in his demeanor."

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