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    #1

    want with and without "to"

    Example.

    1.1 I'll come with you if you want.
    1.2 I'll come with you if you want to.

    2.1 You can stay if you want.
    2.2 You can stay if you want to.

    3.1 I could say anything I wanted in English.
    3.2 I could say anything I wanted to in English.

    Which one is correct?
    And, what's the difference between want and want to?

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: want with and without "to"

    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs.Almost View Post
    Example.

    1.1 I'll come with you if you want. A conditional with if clause
    1.2 I'll come with you if you want to. The moment you put preposition 'to' it should have an object or act as infinitive phrase. You can say: I'll come with you if you want to take me

    2.1 You can stay if you want.
    2.2 You can stay if you want to bear the cost.

    3.1 I could say anything I wanted in English.
    3.2 I could say anything I wanted to in English. You can not have two prepositions side by side.

    Which one is correct?
    And, what's the difference between want and want to?
    SKP

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    #3

    Re: want with and without "to"

    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs.Almost View Post
    Example.

    1.2 I'll come with you if you want me to.


    2.2 You can stay if you want to (stay).

    3.2 I could say anything I wanted to (say) in English.
    Regarding the latter two, omitting words whose meanings are understood to be present is common in oral (English) and in casual written English.

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    #4

    Re: want with and without "to"

    Hello Mrs.Almost

    I agree here:

    1.1 I'll come with you if you want (me to come).
    1.2 I'll come with you if you want to.

    • Example 1.2 is awkward:

    ?I'll come with you if you want to (come).
    In that example, periphrastic want to has an underlying or elliptical verb, notably the verb come. As is, 1.2 reads awkward as ?I'll come with you because you've asked me to come, but only if you come too.

    Note that, the entire phrase want to functions as a whole. We know this because it can be contracted to wanna <want to. Which is why want me to come isn't the correct interpretation for 1.2.
    2.1 You can stay if you want.
    2.2 You can stay if you want to (stay).

    3.1 I could say anything I wanted in English.
    3.2 I could say anything I wanted to (say) in English.

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    #5

    Re: want with and without "to"

    (Redundant)

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