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  1. lycen
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    #1

    Present continuous

    Hi,

    I know that present continuous can be used to describe about future event with the use of a future indicator like "tomorrow" and "next week".

    Is it possible to use the present continuous to describe the future without the use of those words?

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Present continuous

    Yes, it is.

    "I'm flying to Puerto Rico, then I'm taking off for Rio."


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    #3

    Re: Present continuous

    It's not really present then, is it?

    It would be better to call this form "the progressive". As for the past, call it past progressive or past continuous, assuming it's not part of a second conditional, in which case there is a present time reference, and therefore, "the second form progressive" could be more appropriate: the past progressive and the past are not always used to refer to past time, and the present is not always used to refer to present time, hence the terms "first form", "second form", and "third form". The third form is the past participle, but we don't always use this for the past. A past participle can also be used with present or future time references with the passive voice, and it can also be used with a future time reference in the future perfect or future perfect progressive. The simple present form, is not always present. We use the simple present to speak of future events that are scheduled or part of a timetable, and we use the simple present in past narratives as well. Therefore, call it the first form.

    So in English we have the first form, the second form, and the third form.


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    #4

    Re: Present continuous

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    Yes, it is.

    "I'm flying to Puerto Rico, then I'm taking off for Rio."
    Are there other examples?

    Is this correct?
    A: What are you doing tonight?
    B: I am visiting my parents (tonight).


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    #5

    Re: Present continuous

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    It's not really present then, is it?

    It would be better to call this form "the progressive".
    That doesn't help much either, Pro, because it isn't a progressive, it's a future likely to be realized action.

    I guess renaming some things might be helpful but anyway, it's just the form that's used.

  3. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Present continuous

    Quote Originally Posted by lycen View Post
    Are there other examples?

    Is this correct?
    A: What are you doing tonight?
    B: I am visiting my parents (tonight).
    Good examples, yes.


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    #7

    Re: Present continuous

    Quote Originally Posted by lycen View Post
    Hi,

    I know that present continuous can be used to describe about future event with the use of a future indicator like "tomorrow" and "next week".

    Is it possible to use the present continuous to describe the future without the use of those words?
    I'd say that it's certainly possible but that the likelihood diminishes without a future indicator unless the context supports it.


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    #8

    Re: Present continuous

    Quote Originally Posted by albeit View Post
    That doesn't help much either, Pro, because it isn't a progressive, it's a future likely to be realized action.

    I guess renaming some things might be helpful but anyway, it's just the form that's used.
    Agreed - it's just the form that is used. However, clarity could, and would, help students better understand how English verbs really function. English doesn't have "conjugations". How does it feel to say "this is the present progressive, but we use it for the future"? Does it feel something like saying "this is a bowl, but we call it a glass because you can still drink from it, but we don't use it to drink". If it doesn't feel something like that, then it should.

    Last edited by PROESL; 18-Sep-2009 at 05:54.


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    #9

    Re: Present continuous

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    Agreed - it's just the form that is used. However, clarity could, and would, help students better understand how English verbs really function. English doesn't have "conjugations". How does it feel to say "this the present progressive, but we use it for the future"? Does it feel something like saying "this is a bowl, but we call it a glass because you can still drink from it, but we don't use it to drink". If it doesn't feel something like that, then it should.

    I agree, clarity is best all round. But this is peanuts compared to the misinformation that still circulates on language; that/which, no 'can' for permission, modals have tense, subjunctive, ... .

    I wonder what you'd call a present progressive/continuous form that is used for a future or a present simple that does the same thing? Renaming these things sure isn't somethin' I wanna tackle.


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    #10

    Re: Present continuous

    Quote Originally Posted by albeit View Post
    I agree, clarity is best all round. But this is peanuts compared to the misinformation that still circulates on language; that/which, no 'can' for permission, modals have tense, subjunctive, ... .

    I wonder what you'd call a present progressive/continuous form that is used for a future or a present simple that does the same thing? Renaming these things sure isn't somethin' I wanna tackle.
    Well, I've already mentioned this in another way, I think, but here it is, anyway.

    present simple that does the same thing? < This the first form. One use of the first form is to express a future action or event that is part of a schedule or timetable.

    The plane leaves at six.

    So then that's it. We wake up at four tomorrow, and we're at the boat by five ready to fish. Let's get some sleep now.

    present progressive/continuous form that is used for a future - This the progressive form, which uses the form of "be" as an auxiliary. One use of the progressive form is to express something that is planned or arranged.

    We're waking up early to go fishing tomorrow.

    There's also a progressive form which uses the second form of "be". This progressive form is used to express ongoing actions, events, or activities in the past, and it can also be used with reference to the present or future as part of a second conditional (hypothetical present or hypothetical future - distant possibility).

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