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    #1

    there

    I would like to know the difference between 3 sentences.

    (Looking out a window, in the morning)
    1. There's snow.
    2. It's snowing.
    3. Snow is coming.


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
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    #2

    Re: there

    (Looking out a window, in the morning)

    1. There's snow.
    This probably suggests that there is snow on the ground, but does not especially mean that snow is currently falling.

    2. It's snowing.
    This means that snow is currently falling.

    3. Snow is coming.
    This means that a snowstorm is predicted.

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      • French
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    #3

    Re: there

    Hello, Ann1977,

    I would like to know one thing about your explanation.It's about the third sentences.

    Snow is coming.

    You write : 'This means that a snowstorm is predicted'. Can the meaning be that 'it is going simply sonwing'?

    I am not a teacher I am just a beginner in English, but I would like to know your opinion.

    Thank in advance Ann1977.(sorry for my mistakes, do not hesitate to correct me).

    Best regards.


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
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    #4

    Re: there

    Quote Originally Posted by The French View Post
    Hello, Ann1977,

    I would like to know one thing about your explanation.It's about the third sentences.

    Snow is coming.

    You write : 'This means that a snowstorm is predicted'. Can the meaning be that 'it is going simply snowing'?

    Oh dear. This is a wretched beginning.

    I'm sorry to say that your sentence "It is going simply snowing" does not have any meaning.

    However, if you mean "It is going to snow," then the answer is YES.

    "Snow is coming" means exactly "It is going to snow," and furthermore, it is a closer paraphrase than my suggestion ("A snowstorm is predicted.")

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