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    • Join Date: May 2008
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    #1

    "Science is about knowing. It's not about believing."

    Hello.

    "Science is about knowing. It's not about believing."
    "Fiction is all about using the imagination."

    Do about, about and about mean the same thing? Are they used to indicate the most important or basic part or purpose of something?

    Thank you.

  1. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "Science is about knowing. It's not about believing."

    The first two are the same: "is about" means "has as its essential purpose."

    The second, "to be all about," tends to be a different phrase nowadays. "It's all about the beef" means something like "all the excitement and talk is about the beef." It means something more social, normative, and fad-related.

    But, in this case, it is used in the sense of the first two "abouts" so the "all" there basically carries no meaning here.

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