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    #1

    What is the implication of the sentence?

    Hello Everyone,

    Can the underlined be undersood as " you get lost in a footpath."? And through the sentence " The next time......for a drive", does the author imply that "you", under the circumstances, are anxious and impatient and will almost lose “his ”temper?
    ...
    Which is why the greatest reason to celebrate this 40th anniversary isn't scientific or environmental or political;
    it's personal. The next time you go down a footpath just to see where it leads, or when the only thing that will stop your baby crying is taking it for a drive, remember the 12 men who stood on the Moon and looked at Earth.
    As T. S. Eliot put it:
    We shall not cease from exploration
    And the end of all our exploring
    Will be to arrive where we started
    And know the place for the first time.
    ...
    Regards
    Sky


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
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    #2

    Re: What is the implication of the sentence?

    Quote Originally Posted by sky753 View Post
    Hello Everyone,

    Can the underlined be undersood as " you get lost in a footpath."? And through the sentence " The next time......for a drive", does the author imply that "you", under the circumstances, are anxious and impatient and will almost lose “his ”temper?
    ...
    Which is why the greatest reason to celebrate this 40th anniversary isn't scientific or environmental or political;
    it's personal. The next time you go down a footpath just to see where it leads, or when the only thing that will stop your baby crying is taking it for a drive, remember the 12 men who stood on the Moon and looked at Earth.
    As T. S. Eliot put it:
    We shall not cease from exploration
    And the end of all our exploring
    Will be to arrive where we started
    And know the place for the first time.
    ...
    Regards
    Sky
    Can the underlined be understood as "you get lost in a footpath"?

    No. The idea of "going down a footpath just to see where it leads" is not "getting lost."

    Instead, it means just poking around to see where it will take you, exploring for the fun of it, following your nose to see where you'll end up. There's no idea of getting lost.
    The idea is exploration for fun.
    _________________________________________

    " The next time......for a drive", does the author imply that "you", under the circumstances, are anxious and impatient and will almost lose “his ”temper?

    No. The reference to taking the baby for a drive is to a piece of folk wisdom which holds that a colicky baby who cannot be comforted by any other method is soothed by riding in the car.

    It is widely believed that babies who are crying and fussing without relief will drop off into a blissful sleep as soon as they are taken for a drive.

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    #3

    Re: What is the implication of the sentence?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    Can the underlined be understood as "you get lost in a footpath"?

    No. The idea of "going down a footpath just to see where it leads" is not "getting lost."

    Instead, it means just poking around to see where it will take you, exploring for the fun of it, following your nose to see where you'll end up. There's no idea of getting lost.
    The idea is exploration for fun.
    _________________________________________

    " The next time......for a drive", does the author imply that "you", under the circumstances, are anxious and impatient and will almost lose “his ”temper?

    No. The reference to taking the baby for a drive is to a piece of folk wisdom which holds that a colicky baby who cannot be comforted by any other method is soothed by riding in the car.

    It is widely believed that babies who are crying and fussing without relief will drop off into a blissful sleep as soon as they are taken for a drive.
    Then why does the author write "remember the 12 men who stood on the Moon and looked at Earth. As T. S. Eliot put it"
    I can't find any connection in meanings between the sentence and the "The next time...drive" sentence. It seems to me that they are isolated based on your understanding.


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    #4

    Re: What is the implication of the sentence?

    Quote Originally Posted by sky753 View Post
    Then why does the author write "remember the 12 men who stood on the Moon and looked at Earth. As T. S. Eliot put it"
    I can't find any connection in meanings between the sentence and the "The next time...drive" sentence. It seems to me that they are isolated based on your understanding.
    I can't find any connections either.

    I think that all the passages you have been posting from whatever you are reading demonstrate that whatever you are reading is crap.

    The author is flailing to make his work sound profound. Apparently he was obliged to write his reflections on the 40th anniversary of the Apollo moon landing, but he did not have a single worthy idea in his head.

    Instead of just giving it up as a bad job, he manufactured all these goofy and spurious connections between the Apollo event and any old thing that randomly crossed his mind.

    The state of the economy, taking a baby for a ride in a car, wandering down a footpath, blah blah blah. It's all forced and contrived and desperate, without a lick of sense.

    You should stop reading this crap immediately. Switch to something of value. No one can tell you what the author means because it doesn't mean anything.

    Why not read a work of fiction from the list of classics, or from pop culture? Or how about something from the New Yorker? Even package inserts and instruction manuals (like the things that Daruma is reading) would be better.

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    #5

    Re: What is the implication of the sentence?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    I can't find any connections either.

    I think that all the passages you have been posting from whatever you are reading demonstrate that whatever you are reading is crap.

    The author is flailing to make his work sound profound. Apparently he was obliged to write his reflections on the 40th anniversary of the Apollo moon landing, but he did not have a single worthy idea in his head.

    Instead of just giving it up as a bad job, he manufactured all these goofy and spurious connections between the Apollo event and any old thing that randomly crossed his mind.

    The state of the economy, taking a baby for a ride in a car, wandering down a footpath, blah blah blah. It's all forced and contrived and desperate, without a lick of sense.

    You should stop reading this crap immediately. Switch to something of value. No one can tell you what the author means because it doesn't mean anything.

    Why not read a work of fiction from the list of classics, or from pop culture? Or how about something from the New Yorker? Even package inserts and instruction manuals (like the things that Daruma is reading) would be better.

    The recent posts here is about a written English Chinese translation competition initiated by the newspaper office of the readers' reference. I am amazed that the office hasn't studied the original materials carefully as I believe that thousands of readers are spending lots of time on these stiff sentences for the honor and prize! The original link is as follows:

    http://bx.businessweek.com/commercial-space-travel/view?url=http%3A%2F%2Fc.moreover.com%2Fclick%2Fher e.pl%3Fr2095905798%26f%3D9791


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    #6

    Re: What is the implication of the sentence?

    Quote Originally Posted by sky753 View Post
    The recent posts here is about a written English Chinese translation competition initiated by the newspaper office of the readers' reference. I am amazed that the office hasn't studied the original materials carefully as I believe that thousands of readers are spending lots of time on these stiff sentences for the honor and prize! The original link is as follows:

    http://bx.businessweek.com/commercial-space-travel/view?url=http%3A%2F%2Fc.moreover.com%2Fclick%2Fher e.pl%3Fr2095905798%26f%3D9791

    Thanks for that link.

    The article did have more coherence, naturally, when I read it as a whole.

    But its glibness covers a remarkably shallow central theme:

    You don't go to a Rolling Stones concert to give Mick Jagger a charge, but to get one.

    Whatever. If you are not required to process this article, I still think you can find reading matter far more worthy of your time.

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