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    • Join Date: May 2008
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    #1

    The minutes ticked past and still she didn't call.

    Hello.

    tick - Definition from Longman English Dictionary Online
    tick away/by/past
    if time ticks away, by, or past, it passes, especially when you are waiting for something to happen: We need a decision - time's ticking away.
    The minutes ticked past and still she didn't call.


    1. The minutes ticked past and still she didn't call.
    2. The minutes ticked past and she still didn't call.

    Does #2 sound good?

    Thank you.
    Last edited by Daruma; 20-Sep-2009 at 16:38.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: The minutes ticked past and still she didn't call.

    2's OK, but doesn't sound as emphatic to me. In a case like this the more prominent position for the 'still' is more essential:
    'I've told you time and time again not to do it, but still you eat your lunch in the classroom.'

    But your redrafting of the Longman's example sounds OK to me.

    b

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: The minutes ticked past and still she didn't call.

    PS - There's an idiomatic use of 'the clock's ticking' - said to a woman in her thirties. The reference is to her biological clock.

    b

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