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  1. wynnmyintuu's Avatar
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    #1

    Question help wanted from a native speaker

    The following sentence is from a degree certificate. I don't think it makes sense. Please check it and say whether it makes sense. Thanks in advance.
    "This is to certify that Miss ........, daughter of Mr ......., has been admitted to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in English by ............ University."


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    #2

    Re: help wanted from a native speaker

    Quote Originally Posted by wynnmyintuu View Post
    The following sentence is from a degree certificate. I don't think it makes sense. Please check it and say whether it makes sense. Thanks in advance.
    "This is to certify that Miss ........, daughter of Mr ......., has been admitted to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in English by ............ University."
    The expression "has been admitted to the degree of Bachelor of Arts" is not how this idea is expressed in American English.

    In the US, the certificate (called a "diploma") would read
    ". . .has been awarded (or "granted") the degree of Bachelor of Arts. . ."

    In the US, a person is never identified as "the daughter of Mr ....." except perhaps in those few newspaper stories where it matters to the plot that these two people are related, and in what way they are related. And women are not identified as "Miss . . ." either.

    Possibly in British usage one is "admitted to the degree of Bachelor of Arts...," but not in the US.

    In the US, a person is "admitted" to a university (sometimes you might say "a program," or a "course of study"), which will lead to being awarded a BA.

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    #3

    Re: help wanted from a native speaker

    It doesn't make any sense in Canadian English either. There would never be a Miss/Mr/Ms/Mrs on a certificate or degree. It just states the name.

    And, I have also never heard of :"daughter of" being used in that way either.

    Is this certificate from a legitimate educational institution?


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    #4

    Re: help wanted from a native speaker

    Quote Originally Posted by Searching for language View Post
    It doesn't make any sense in Canadian English either. There would never be a Miss/Mr/Ms/Mrs on a certificate or degree. It just states the name.

    And, I have also never heard of :"daughter of" being used in that way either.

    Is this certificate from a legitimate educational institution?
    The asker lives in Myanmar

    Last edited by Anglika; 30-Sep-2009 at 19:07.

  2. wynnmyintuu's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: help wanted from a native speaker

    Thanks for your answers. Now I see the sentence in my question isn't American or Canadian English. But what about British English? I'll be happy to know whether it is acceptable in British English. The sentence is from an official degree certificate in Myanmar.


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    #6

    Re: help wanted from a native speaker

    Quote Originally Posted by wynnmyintuu View Post
    Thanks for your answers. Now I see the sentence in my question isn't American or Canadian English. But what about British English? I'll be happy to know whether it is acceptable in British English. The sentence is from an official degree certificate in Myanmar.

    The "Daughter of" and "Miss" stuff would not be found in Britain.

    I don't know for sure if they use the expression "to be admitted to" or not.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: help wanted from a native speaker

    Quote Originally Posted by wynnmyintuu View Post
    Thanks for your answers. Now I see the sentence in my question isn't American or Canadian English. But what about British English? I'll be happy to know whether it is acceptable in British English. The sentence is from an official degree certificate in Myanmar.
    "Admitted to the degree of..." is an old form of words previously widely used around the world, now largely replaced by "awarded" but still used in some universities. In India most official documents show the name of the father of the concerned person. Does this help?
    Last edited by bhaisahab; 28-Sep-2009 at 09:50. Reason: correction

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: help wanted from a native speaker



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    #9

    Re: help wanted from a native speaker

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    That IS interesting!

    And there's the expression "admitted to the degree of . . ."


    But what on earth is a Bachelor of Arts in Surgery?

  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: help wanted from a native speaker

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    That IS interesting!

    And there's the expression "admitted to the degree of . . ."


    But what on earth is a Bachelor of Arts in Surgery?
    A doctor (surgeon) I once knew told me that medecine is an art more than it is a science. Here is an interesting link on the subject:
    Medicine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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