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    #1

    He had a "tongue" of hair.

    What does it mean : "He had a "tongue" of hair." Does this mean his (remaining) hair is "tongue" shaped ?


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    #2

    Re: He had a "tongue" of hair.

    Quote Originally Posted by ph2004 View Post
    What does it mean : "He had a "tongue" of hair." Does this mean his (remaining) hair is "tongue" shaped ?
    I've not heard that, Ph, but your idea sounds reasonable. Do you have more context?

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    #3

    Re: He had a "tongue" of hair.

    Quote Originally Posted by albeit View Post
    I've not heard that, Ph, but your idea sounds reasonable. Do you have more context?
    No, sorry, I don't have more information.

    Thanks for your reply !

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    #4

    Re: He had a "tongue" of hair.

    Could this possibly refer to what the young men in the late 80's (my son being one of them) called a mullet? Most of the hair neatly trimmed, but a bit at the back of the head quite long, down to the top of the shirt collar, or even longer. That could be considered "tongue" shaped.

    I am not a teacher.

  1. Sharonk123's Avatar

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    #5

    Re: He had a "tongue" of hair.

    Quote Originally Posted by Searching for language View Post
    Could this possibly refer to what the young men in the late 80's (my son being one of them) called a mullet? Most of the hair neatly trimmed, but a bit at the back of the head quite long, down to the top of the shirt collar, or even longer. That could be considered "tongue" shaped.

    I am not a teacher.
    I am going to venture a guess and say you heard the word "ton" and not the word "tounge." "He had a ton of hair," is a very common phrase. It means someone has a great deal of hair. "He had a tounge of hair," is not something I have heard before.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: He had a "tongue" of hair.

    Excellent thought, Sharon. I had no clue what a "tongue" of hair might be!

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    #7

    Re: He had a "tongue" of hair.

    Ton of hair certainly makes more sense.

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