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  1. anupumh's Avatar
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    #1

    Take you for a ride vs ride you

    Hi,

    what are the meanings of these respective statements and do they mean the same?

    People take you for a ride.

    People ride you.

    Thanks


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
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    #2

    Re: Take you for a ride vs ride you

    People take you for a ride.

    1) Someone drives you around in his car for pleasure -- "to go for a ride."
    - "My son and daughter-in-law took me for a ride in the country last weekend."

    2) Someone swindles you or cheats you of money, or pulls a con game on you.
    "Man, that fortune teller sure took me for a ride! I paid all that money and nothing she said came true."

    3) Someone bumps you off Mafia-style -- "two in the hat."
    "What happened to Vito? I haven't seen him around lately."
    "He was skimming from the take from the nags, so they took him for a ride."
    -----------------------------------------------

    People ride you.

    Unless you are a horse, this expression has only a figurative meaning.
    It means to persistently nag or harass you, to get on your case.
    > A boss might ride you all day long at work.
    > A school bully might ride you whenever he got the chance.

  2. anupumh's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Take you for a ride vs ride you

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    People take you for a ride.

    1) Someone drives you around in his car for pleasure -- "to go for a ride."
    - "My son and daughter-in-law took me for a ride in the country last weekend."

    2) Someone swindles you or cheats you of money, or pulls a con game on you.
    "Man, that fortune teller sure took me for a ride! I paid all that money and nothing she said came true."

    3) Someone bumps you off Mafia-style -- "two in the hat."
    "What happened to Vito? I haven't seen him around lately."
    "He was skimming from the take from the nags, so they took him for a ride."
    -----------------------------------------------

    People ride you.

    Unless you are a horse, this expression has only a figurative meaning.
    It means to persistently nag or harass you, to get on your case.
    > A boss might ride you all day long at work.
    > A school bully might ride you whenever he got the chance.
    gud morning, supprized to see you so early... thanks for the detailed reply as ever....

    a few terms went on top of my head, please help me with them.

    swindles you
    pulls a con game on you
    Someone bumps you off Mafia-style
    two in the hat
    He was skimming from the take from the nags, so they took him for a ride
    to get on your case

    Please explain the meaning and the usage of above mentioned words/expressions/sentences.

    Thanks a ton


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    #4

    Re: Take you for a ride vs ride you

    gud morning, supprized to see you so early... thanks for the detailed reply as ever....

    Good morning to you! I got up early, and my first class is not until 10, so I have some time to play around on line.

    swindles you
    "To swindle" is to cheat by wiles or trickery

    pulls a con game on you
    A con game is a "confidence" game -- a kind of defrauding
    Con Artists and the Games They Play

    Someone bumps you off Mafia-style
    "to bump off" is to murder, especially to "hit" (a gangland execution)
    "Mafia-style' means a professional (but illegal) execution (as opposed to a messy amateur butchering), by being shot by a "hit man." The assault (the "hit") comes unexpectedly, so there is no messy struggle.

    > (with dry sarcasm) "Is there anybody else you want me to bump off?"
    - James Bond speaking to M in Ian Fleming's Thunderball (1961)

    two in the hat
    "Two in the hat" is a black-humor term meaning that the person who was bumped off was shot two times in the back of the head -- right through his hat.
    It is also used figuratively to say slangily that someone was dumped from a job -- kicked out unceremoniously, purged, sh**canned, etc.
    > "The Governor cleaned house last week, giving the Assistant DA two in the hat."

    He was skimming
    "to skim" means to take some of the money for yourself instead of delivering all of it to the higher-ups or to its intended purpose.
    Sometimes politicians are indicted for skimming from their campaign funds.

    from the take
    "the take" means "the income," the money earned or generated.
    It is used almost exclusively for ill-gotten gains (or humorously).
    It's used sometimes as slang to refer to box-office receipts.

    from the nags,
    "the nags" means horse racing. It is widely thought that organized crime makes money by fixing horse races, or at least by improper wagering on the outcomes. ("nag" is a term for a broken-down horse)
    > "I just lost a week's pay on the nags."


    so they took him for a ride
    They bumped him off by giving him two in the hat.
    The expression "take for a ride" refers to the practice of driving the victim to a convenient location for killing and burying him -- the mobsters invite him to "go for a ride" -- to the New Jersey marshes or seashore -- where he is killed and buried. The victim (the "vick") is pretty nervous, but they keep him reassured until they get a chance to shoot him in the back of the head.

    This can also be used figuratively:
    > "When the boss asked me to go to lunch, I was afraid I was going for a ride."
    (This means he thought he was going to be fired.)

    To "take someone for a ride" also means to scam or defraud them, to cheat them of money. In this use, it is the same as "take him around the block." I think this term comes from the practice of taxi drivers to go the long way around in order to run up the fare.
    > "I want to go to Fifth Avenue, driver, and don't try taking me for a ride. I've lived in this town since before you were born."

    to get on your case
    This means to nag or harass, to ride someone.
    > "Hey! Get off my case, will ya! I told you I'd do it as soon as I got around to it."
    > "That Charlie is a big bully. He gets on my case the minute he sees me. He rides me all day long in school."
    > "I hate my job. The boss is on my case over every little thing."

  3. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Take you for a ride vs ride you

    Sometimes "ride you" means "tease you."

    To take you for a ride often means "cheat you."

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