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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Armenian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 2,554
    #1

    whom

    Are these sentences correct:

    1-The man whom it scared Jane to see was actually the doctor.
    2-The man Jane was scared to see was actually the doctor.

    I have asked similar questions before and this particular 'thing' always poses a problem for me. It is something that is easily said in my native language but apparently in English one can't cram these ideas into a single sentence elegently. (There are cases where English is more flexible than my mother tongue. That is not the point.)

    The idea I want to express is this:

    A-The man whose sight scared Jane was actually the doctor.

    I think 1 does not work and I think 2 doesn't mean the same as A. If I am not mistaken, 'the man Jane was scared to see', means 'the man Jane was afraid of seeing', and not The man whose sight scared Jane.

  1. anupumh's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,110
    #2

    Re: whom

    Quote Originally Posted by navi tasan View Post
    Are these sentences correct:

    1-The man whom it scared Jane to see was actually the doctor.
    2-The man Jane was scared to see was actually the doctor.

    I have asked similar questions before and this particular 'thing' always poses a problem for me. It is something that is easily said in my native language but apparently in English one can't cram these ideas into a single sentence elegently. (There are cases where English is more flexible than my mother tongue. That is not the point.)

    The idea I want to express is this:

    A-The man whose sight scared Jane was actually the doctor.

    I think 1 does not work and I think 2 doesn't mean the same as A. If I am not mistaken, 'the man Jane was scared to see', means 'the man Jane was afraid of seeing', and not The man whose sight scared Jane.
    First one is grammatically incorrect. Second one is grammatically correct, but does not convey the meanining which you intend to...

    You can make small modifications in the first statement to make it grammatically correct...

    The man who scared Jane was actually the doctor.
    The man by whom Jane got scared, was actually the doctor.
    The man whom Jane got scared by, was actually the doctor.

    You dont need the "it"

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