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    #1

    of or about

    Have you told him of/about what we discussed this morning?

    At many a place, I find this ambiguity whether to use of or about? Could you please clear my doubt?

    thanks so much in advance

    Kiran

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: of or about

    With discussed, just use "what" without the preposition.

    Have you told him what we discussed this morning? (You wouldn't say "We discussed about our vacation plans." You'd say "We discussed our vacation plans.)

    or
    Have you told him what we talked about this morning? (You would say "We talked about our vacation plans.")

    Note that if you try to say "Have you told him about what we talked" it will sound very stilted and unnatural.

    I will remember this one the next time someone continues to insist that it's bad grammar to end with an preposition. (No, it's not, and as this sentence demonstrates, it's more natural to do so.)


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    #3

    Re: of or about

    Quote Originally Posted by kiranlegend View Post
    Have you told him of/about what we discussed this morning?

    At many a place, I find this ambiguity whether to use of or about? Could you please clear my doubt?

    thanks so much in advance

    Kiran
    Using "about" indicates information or things regarding something. It indicates many things, or a number of things surrounding an idea, a place, a person, or group of people. It's more general in the presenting of information.

    Using "of" indicates something more specific, and likely focuses on a more limited set of information, or just one piece of information.

    Take a look at these typical present perfect questions:

    Have you heard about the bus drivers' strike? - This means there is information surrounding the bus driver's strike.

    Tim Hudson is the union leader. Have you ever heard of him? - This means do you know who Tim Hudson is. It does not mean, "Do you know or do you have information that has to do with Tim Hudson?".

    Have you ever heard anything about Tim Hudson? No, I've heard anything about him. - These speak of knowing information in general about Tim Hudson or things about Tim Hudson.

    Sometimes "of" and "about" are interchangeable with little or no difference in meaning. Other times it's clear that they're not interchangeable.


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    #4

    Smile Re: of or about

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    With discussed, just use "what" without the preposition.

    Have you told him what we discussed this morning? (You wouldn't say "We discussed about our vacation plans." You'd say "We discussed our vacation plans.)

    or
    Have you told him what we talked about this morning? (You would say "We talked about our vacation plans.")

    Note that if you try to say "Have you told him about what we talked" it will sound very stilted and unnatural.

    I will remember this one the next time someone continues to insist that it's bad grammar to end with an preposition. (No, it's not, and as this sentence demonstrates, it's more natural to do so.)
    It's correct to say "Have you told him about what we discussed?" However, it's not correct to say "Have you told him what we discussed about?" Is that what you mean by "with discussed, just use what without the preposition"?

    I didn't tell him anything about what we discussed. I didn't tell him anything that we discussed about.


  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: of or about

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    It's correct to say "Have you told him about what we discussed?"
    So you're using "what we discussed" as the object, and "tell about" as the phrasal verb, which is different than the plain verb "tell"?

    Have you told him about our trip to Paris? (Vs. Have you told him we're going to Paris?)
    Have you told him about your new job? (Vs. Have you told him you have a new job?)
    Have you told him about [what we discussed this morning but I'm too coy to mention plainly right now]? (Vs. Have you told him what we discussed?)

    Yes, that works. That's not how I was reading it. Different verb.

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