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    #1

    A suspicion and some suspicions

    I have a suspicion about his ability.

    I have some suspicions about his ability.

    I take some suspicions refers to the number of points I could make when question someone's ability. Am I right?

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: A suspicion and some suspicions

    Quote Originally Posted by cubezero3 View Post
    I have a number of suspicions about his ability.

    I have some/many suspicions about his ability.

    I take some suspicions refers to the number of points I could make when question someone's ability. Am I right?
    Yes, You mean rightly but use a number of and many instead of 'a' and 'some' as suspicion is a countable noun.

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    #3

    Re: A suspicion and some suspicions

    Thank you for your kind reply, my friend.

    If I have several suspicions about a certain theory. What do you think these several suspicions may refer to? Could it be the number reasons the speaker has?

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: A suspicion and some suspicions

    I don't fine this a natural use of "suspicion" at all.

    This is when you should use "doubt" (which so many learners use to simply mean "question").

    And I would find it natural in the plural.

    I have some doubts about his ability to do this. You generally don't think about this as several individual components, but it's more natural to say it that way.

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    #5

    Re: A suspicion and some suspicions

    Thank you for your kind reply, Barb_D.

    I came across these two examples when I was looking up the definition of the word suspicion from Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary. I changed them a little bit. The original examples were:

    I have a suspicion that she is not telling me the truth.

    It appears to be genuine, but I have my suspicions about it.

    It was at that moment, this thought sprang to me that native speakers might use the plural form of the word suspicion to indicate a subtle change in meaning, e.g., they may hold more than one good arguments to support their disbelief.

    Having read your reply, however, I begin to think that I may have been too careful on this work. I would take a further guess that they're only ordinary sayings and people don't necessarily think of their difference when using them, like in my language, where people use many phrases only because they've been in use for hundreds of years and everybody's using them, despite the existence of many other possible alternatives. Thus, I don't have to bother myself with the fine difference between them and only need to memorize and use them whenever needed. Besides, people can always add their explanations in interpreting the meanings of them, as kids would do.

    Am I right to think so?

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