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    #1

    reading dates

    "On December 1 a report appeared in a local newspaper about it."

    How does one read the date above?

    - "On December the first a report ... "
    - "On December first a report ... "
    - "On December one a report ... "

    And similarly "On December 5 the case was closed."

    In the book I am reading, the dates come just like above (that is, with simple cardinal numbers, not ordinal ones). I guess it would be the same to write instead "On December 5th the case was closed." But when it is written as cardinal, should one read as ordinal?

  1. buggles's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: reading dates

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    "On December 1 a report appeared in a local newspaper about it."

    How does one read the date above?

    - "On December the first a report ... "
    - "On December first a report ... "
    - "On December one a report ... "

    And similarly "On December 5 the case was closed."

    In the book I am reading, the dates come just like above (that is, with simple cardinal numbers, not ordinal ones). I guess it would be the same to write instead "On December 5th the case was closed." But when it is written as cardinal, should one read as ordinal?
    "On December 5th the case was closed." is ok, but would more usually be written and spoken as......

    On the 5th of December...........

    buggles (not a teacher)

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    #3

    Re: reading dates

    Quote Originally Posted by buggles View Post
    "On December 5th the case was closed." is ok, but would more usually be written and spoken as......

    On the 5th of December...........

    buggles (not a teacher)
    That is what I used to think about dates buggles. However, I am reading a book where dates appear like that: "On December 5 ...". This book was written by an English author, in 1974. When I read those passages, my mind keeps pronouncing them like "On December fifth ... " or "On December the fifth ...", so is such 'mind behaviour' of mine correct?

  2. buggles's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: reading dates

    It certainly is!

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    #5

    Re: reading dates

    While reading two other independent books, I continued finding dates written this way:
    "The following morning, Wednesday 30, 1832, in an isolated field ... "
    "On September 28, 2000, Lulu ate several ... "

    1) Are dates ever written like "On September 28th, ... "?
    2) I am still in doubt on how to read out loud sentences like that. When we read out loud "On Semptember 28, 2000, Lulu ... " do we pronounce something like "On September the twenty-eighth of two thousand ... ", or do we pronounce the way it is written?

    One of the mentioned books was about some grammar rules, and it stated that a comma is mandatory after the day of the month, that is:

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    "On December 1, a report appeared in a local newspaper about it."
    Is such comma after "1" above obrigatory, the book I mentioned in the first post of this thread did not use it.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: reading dates

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    While reading two other independent books, I continued finding dates written this way:
    "The following morning, Wednesday 30, 1832, in an isolated field ... "
    "On September 28, 2000, Lulu ate several ... "

    1) Are dates ever written like "On September 28th, ... "?
    As you have quoted is exactly how I would write them, not with the "th" or "st" (etc.). On some occasions (formal invitations for example) we write something like "On the thirty-first of March."

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    2) I am still in doubt on how to read out loud sentences like that. When we read out loud "On Semptember 28, 2000, Lulu ... " do we pronounce something like "On September the twenty-eighth of two thousand ... ", or do we pronounce the way it is written?
    Reading it aloud, I would say "On September twenty-eighth, two thousand, Lulu..."

    EDIT: I accidentally omitted the very important "H" - I would say "28th" out loud. Sorry about that!
    Last edited by Barb_D; 28-Dec-2009 at 23:01.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. Offroad's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: reading dates

    Most people tend to use the American version, almost always shorter.

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    #8

    Re: reading dates

    Quote Originally Posted by Offroad View Post
    Most people tend to use the American version, almost always shorter.
    Do you mean "On 28 December, ... " is the American version while "On 28th December, ... " is the British version?

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: reading dates

    "On December 28th, ... " (said out loud) is the American version. We generally put the number after the month. We would say this even though we write "On December 28, ..."

    If I was reading something that said "On 28 December" I would say either "On twenty-eight December" or "On the 28th of December" -- and it might just depend on my mood which one.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #10

    Re: reading dates

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    "On December 28th, ... " (said out loud) is the American version. We generally put the number after the month. We would say this even though we write "On December 28, ..."

    If I was reading something that said "On 28 December" I would say either "On twenty-eight December" or "On the 28th of December" -- and it might just depend on my mood which one.
    Thanks Barb_D, now it is completely clear to me.

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