Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. anupumh's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,110
    #1

    Lightbulb Out there

    Hi,

    Is "out there" a proper expression in spoken English of Native speakers?

    Out there, we don't find apples in summers.

    Is this construction appropriate?

    Thanks

  2. Sharonk123's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2009
    • Posts: 40
    #2

    Re: Out there

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Hi,

    Is "out there" a proper expression in spoken English of Native speakers?

    Out there, we don't find apples in summers.

    Is this construction appropriate?

    Thanks
    "Out there" is both a proper phrase and a slang term.
    Example of proper term: Our apple orchard is dying. In summer, we don't find apples out there. This means there are no apples in the orchard.

    Example of slang: My sister dyed her hair orange and is wearing a pink striped vest with a purple poka dot skirt. Her choice of colors is out there.
    This means her style of dress is so different from what is normally seen that it is considered extreme.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #3

    Re: Out there

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Hi,

    Is "out there" a proper expression in spoken English of Native speakers?

    Out there, we don't find apples in summers.

    Is this construction appropriate?

    Thanks
    The phrase "out there" is an expression in English, yes. However, I would revise your sentence: We don't find any apples out there in the summertime. Or: We can't find apples out there in the summertime. And just to be clear, yes, it's a proper expression in English, and native speakers use it regularly.

    Generally, "out there" is an adverbial meaning "anywhere" or "somewhere". Sometimes it's understood to be somewhere distant or not easy to find. However, it could be understood as something relatively close. It depends on the context and how it is used.

    The phrase "out there" can also identify a person or thing as not conventional.

    out there - definition of out there by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

    out there
    Adjective
    Slang unconventional or eccentric

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •