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      • Native Language:
      • Korean
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      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2009
    • Posts: 12
    #1

    take you to the wall

    I heard this expression from a movie.

    A boss said, "I'll take you to the wall" to his secretary and it sounded like he intended to give her a hard time.

    What does "take someone to the wall" mean?

    Thank you.

    -Tony


    • Join Date: Sep 2009
    • Posts: 422
    #2

    Re: take you to the wall

    Quote Originally Posted by fakaki View Post
    I heard this expression from a movie.

    A boss said, "I'll take you to the wall" to his secretary and it sounded like he intended to give her a hard time.

    What does "take someone to the wall" mean?

    Thank you.

    -Tony
    Was it a porn flick, Tony?

    There's at least a couple of double entendres in your posting.

    Without a larger context, it's pretty hard, errr, difficult to say.

    "go to the wall for somebody" means to do all one can for them.

    As I said, it miiiiiight have been a double entendre,

    ========

    M-W

    double entendre

    1 : ambiguity of meaning arising from language that lends itself to more than one interpretation
    2 : a word or expression capable of two interpretations with one usually risqué

    ==============================

    Can you provide more context, which movie, more of the surrounding dialog?


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,131
    #3

    Re: take you to the wall



    • Join Date: Sep 2009
    • Posts: 422
    #4

    Re: take you to the wall

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    Ann, the question was about,

    A boss said, "I'll take you to the wall" to his secretary and it sounded like he intended to give her a hard time.

    What does "take someone to the wall" mean?

    There is no entry for 'take ... " at the website you cited.

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    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 1
    #5

    Re: take you to the wall

    that is so funny i was watching Shrink and the boss said that. I was a little confused because i thought it was a sexual term and i knew that wouldn't fit... So i went to google to find out and this was the first site that came up... that is so creepy... when i read your question i was like wow


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 3,059
    #6

    Re: take you to the wall

    Quote Originally Posted by jaden View Post
    that is so funny i was watching Shrink and the boss said that. I was a little confused because i thought it was a sexual term and i knew that wouldn't fit... So i went to google to find out and this was the first site that came up... that is so creepy... when i read your question i was like wow
    You saw it and heard it and you're a native speaker, Jaden. What do you think it meant?


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,131
    #7

    Re: take you to the wall

    Quote Originally Posted by albeit View Post
    Ann, the question was about,

    A boss said, "I'll take you to the wall" to his secretary and it sounded like he intended to give her a hard time.

    What does "take someone to the wall" mean?

    There is no entry for 'take ... " at the website you cited.
    I'm not sure that matters -- whether the identical phrase is word-for-word or not.

    I think native speakers could (and do) reference the meaning of familiar phrases even when they are adapting the details as necessary to fit the situation.

    "When your back is up against the wall" and "the weak will go to the wall" (and so on) don't have to be identically phrased for the meaning of "being against the wall" to be the point of both.

    Passenger: What did you, take me for a ride?
    Cabbie: We went for a ride.

    There's nothing the same in these sentences but the core expression "for a ride," yet they both refer to the same situation -- and even the identical journey.


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 3,059
    #8

    Re: take you to the wall

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    I'm not sure that matters -- whether the identical phrase is word-for-word or not.

    I think native speakers could (and do) reference the meaning of familiar phrases even when they are adapting the details as necessary to fit the situation.

    "When your back is up against the wall" and "the weak will go to the wall" (and so on) don't have to be identically phrased for the meaning of "being against the wall" to be the point of both.

    Passenger: What did you, take me for a ride?
    Cabbie: We went for a ride.

    There's nothing the same in these sentences but the core expression "for a ride," yet they both refer to the same situation -- and even the identical journey.
    [To set the record straight, riverkid & albeit are the same person]

    Was there supposed to be a 'do' in the passenger's line, Ann?

    There is quite a difference between 'take' and 'go'. In the OP's case, so much so, that "take sb to the wall" has no meaning as an idiom. There's only a literal meaning and so far, given that the context offered is no great shakes, neither of us, native speakers both, has been able to discern the intended meaning.


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,131
    #9

    Re: take you to the wall

    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    [To set the record straight, riverkid & albeit are the same person]

    Was there supposed to be a 'do' in the passenger's line, Ann?

    No, there's no "do" in that locution. It's a slangy way of talking:

    Ex: "What are you, a nut?"

    This is how the punctuation is usually rendered, but it doesn't capture the actual expression at all. The way it's said makes it perform a strange fusion so that the first part -- "What are you?" is one complete thought, but then the "are you" is recycled somehow and re-purposed to make the second part a complete thought too: "are you a nut?"

    It's really pronounced: "What're you a nut?"

    The expression "What did you, take me for a ride?" is actually pronounced:

    "Whaddidja take me for a ride?" or even "whajer take me for a ride?"

    The "did you" is spoken once but made to operate as a component of both halves of the expression -- just like "are you" in the first example.

    "What did you(do)?" and "Did you take me for a ride?"

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