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    • Join Date: May 2008
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    #1

    "dirty" and "filthy"



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    #2

    Re: "dirty" and "filthy"

    It could be both, and it might depend on who's talking.

    Mom says: Tommy! Your hands are filthy. Go wash up right now.

    Mom says: My hands are dirty because I just got finished working in the garden. Let me call you back after I wash up.

    Mom could've said filfthy in the second sentence as well.

    Whether something is truly filthy or just dirty could be a matter of perspective. It depends on how high the tolerance level is set.

    Filfthy does indicate something extremely dirty or unpleasantly dirty, as the definition says.

    A mechanic that just got through working on a car and is about to wash up would likely have filthy hands according to the definition, though they would not evoke disgust or something extremely unpleasant because it's normal for the mechanic's hands to look like this after finishing working on a car. So the mechanic is likely to say "My hands are dirty. I'm going to wash up, and then we'll get some lunch."
    Last edited by PROESL; 25-Sep-2009 at 23:57.


    • Join Date: May 2008
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    #3

    Re: "dirty" and "filthy"

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    It could be both, and it might depend on who's talking.

    Mom says: Tommy! Your hands are filthy. Go wash up right now.

    Mom says: My hands are dirty because I just got finished working in the garden. Let me call you back after I wash up.

    Mom could've said filfthy in the second sentence as well.

    Whether something is truly filfthy or just dirty could be a matter of perspective. It depends on how high the tolerance level is set.

    Filfthy does indicate something extremely dirty or unpleasantly dirty, as the definition says.

    A mechanic that just got through working on a car and is about to wash up would likely have filfthy hands according to the definition, though they would not evoke disgust or something extremely unpleasant because it's normal for the mechanic's hands to look like this after finishing working on a car. So the mechanic is likely to say "My hands are dirty. I'm going to wash up, and then we'll get some lunch."
    Does the same go for "a dirty room" and "a filthy room"?

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    #4

    Re: "dirty" and "filthy"

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Does the same go for "a dirty room" and "a filthy room"?
    To me, a dirty room is one in which you can see that there are small pieces of things on the floor, the tables have not been dusted, there may be some dirty dishes on a table.

    A filthy bedroom, for example, would have clothes on the floor, bed a mess, empty pizza boxes or other take-out containers on the bed, beer bottles lying around etc. etc. (what they say are typical teenagers' or college students' rooms.)

    I am not a teacher.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #5

    Re: "dirty" and "filthy"

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Does the same go for "a dirty room" and "a filthy room"?
    It could, but I think to call a room filthy, the condition of the room would have to evoke a feeling of disgust. If someone thinks it's disgusting, then someone would say it's filthy. Once again, however, I think "dirty" and "filthy" can be subjective. It depends on one's viewpoint. And even if something truly is filthy, a speaker might still be inclined to simply say "dirty".

    Someone once said my Spanish was advanced. However, I know it's really intermediate.

    Last edited by PROESL; 25-Sep-2009 at 23:56.


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    #6

    Re: "dirty" and "filthy"

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    It could, but I think to call a room filthy, the condition of the room would have to evoke a feeling of disgust. If someone thinks it's disgusting, then someone would say it's filthy. Once again, however, I think "dirty" and "filthy" can be subjective. It depends on one's viewpoint. And even if something truly is filthy, a speaker might still be inclined to simply say "dirty".

    Someone once said my Spanish was advanced. However, I know it's really intermediate.

    It's like asking if something is good, very good, or extremely good. It depends on how one defines "good" and "very good". It's subjective and relative.

    Last edited by PROESL; 25-Sep-2009 at 23:55.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #7

    Re: "dirty" and "filthy"

    Quote Originally Posted by Searching for language View Post
    To me, a dirty room is one in which you can see that there are small pieces of things on the floor, the tables have not been dusted, there may be some dirty dishes on a table.

    A filthy bedroom, for example, would have clothes on the floor, bed a mess, empty pizza boxes or other take-out containers on the bed, beer bottles lying around etc. etc. (what they say are typical teenagers' or college students' rooms.)

    I am not a teacher.
    I understand what you mean, but some people could still call your "filthy room" a "dirty room". The choice between the two words is rather subjective.

    Oscar would say that his room is a little dirty or disorganized. Felix would say it needs to be disinfected - filthy.

    Oscar and Felix

    http://www.dvdtalk.com/reviews/image...88210727_1.jpg

    http://img2.timeinc.net/ew/dynamic/i...ddcouple_l.jpg
    Last edited by PROESL; 25-Sep-2009 at 23:54.

  1. mara_ce's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: "dirty" and "filthy"

    I've found a distinction between normal and strong adjectives.
    dirty / filthy
    clever / brillant
    hungry / starving
    pleased / delighted
    upset /devastated
    surprised / amazed, astonished


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    #9

    Re: "dirty" and "filthy"

    Quote Originally Posted by mara_ce View Post
    I've found a distinction between normal and strong adjectives.
    dirty / filthy
    clever / brillant
    hungry / starving
    pleased / delighted
    upset /devastated
    surprised / amazed, astonished
    There is definitely a distinction between that which is filthy and that which is dirty. However, what is filfthy to one person could be dirty to another. What is pleasing to one person could be delightful to another.

    It depends on the person and the circumstances.

    Then there's "starving". Some people say "I'm starving" figuratively to mean that they are very hungry.

    There's a much clearer distinction between hunger and starvation than there might be between dirtiness and filthiness. There's far less subjectivity involved when looking at pictures of starving people and looking at pictures of hungry people. The starving ones are obviously starving.

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    #10

    Re: "dirty" and "filthy"

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    I understand what you mean, but some people could still call your "filthy room" a "dirty room". The choice between the two words is rather subjective.
    And some might call a dirty room filthy to shame the person into cleaning it.

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