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    #1

    A xxxx of results?

    Dear Sir,Madam and all teachers,



    I would like to know in English the the following known as QUANTIFIERS? I translated the category from Chinese to English with google translator get Quantifiers, I'm not sure what are them categorized in English. (I mean nouns, verb etc that sort of category)




    Which should be the correct?


    I'm writing research thesis and thus wish to write the correct sentence.


    A. A large quantity of positive results
    B. A great number of positive results
    C. A large amount of positive results
    Which is the correct one?
    Do plural or singular makes different?
    Does the answer same for "findings"?




    Thanks in advance for your kind advice.




    Fairylord
    Bad Englisher
    Last edited by Fairylord; 26-Sep-2009 at 07:14.

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: A xxxx of results?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fairylord View Post
    Dear Sir,Madam and all teachers,



    I would like to know in English the the following known as QUANTIFIERS? I translated the category from Chinese to English with google translator get Quantifiers, I'm not sure what are them categorized in English. (I mean nouns, verb etc that sort of category)




    Which should be the correct?


    I'm writing research thesis and thus wish to write the correct sentence.




    Which is the correct one?
    Do plural or singular makes different? Yes, with a plural noun you have to choose an appropriate quatifier. Please see the explanation below.
    Does the answer same for "findings"?




    Thanks in advance for your kind advice.




    Fairylord
    Bad Englisher
    Like articles, quantifiers are words that precede and modify nouns. They tell us how many or how much. Selecting the correct quantifier depends on your understanding the distinction between Count and Non-Count Nouns. For our purposes, we will choose the count noun trees and the non-count noun sugar:

    The following quantifiers will work with count nouns:
    many trees
    a few trees
    a lot of trees
    a couple/a large number of trees
    The following quantifiers will work with non-count nouns:
    much sugar
    a little sugar
    a lot of sugar
    a good quantity/large amount of sugar
    The following quantifiers will work with both count and non-count nouns:
    some trees/sugar
    most of the trees/sugar
    enough trees/sugar
    a lot of trees/sugar
    plenty of trees/sugar
    In formal academic writing, it is usually better to use many and much rather than phrases such as a lot of, most of and plenty of.


    On the above basis;
    A. Many (A large quantity of) positive results (result is countable noun, so phrases with words such as quantity or amount are inappropriate)
    B. A great number of positive results (This is correct)
    C. A large amount of positive results Incorrect


    • Join Date: Sep 2009
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    #3

    Re: A xxxx of results?

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    Like articles, quantifiers are words that precede and modify nouns. They tell us how many or how much. Selecting the correct quantifier depends on your understanding the distinction between Count and Non-Count Nouns. For our purposes, we will choose the count noun trees and the non-count noun sugar:

    The following quantifiers will work with count nouns:
    many trees
    a few trees
    a lot of trees
    a couple/a large number of trees
    The following quantifiers will work with non-count nouns:
    much sugar
    a little sugar
    a lot of sugar
    a good quantity/large amount of sugar
    The following quantifiers will work with both count and non-count nouns:
    some trees/sugar
    most of the trees/sugar
    enough trees/sugar
    a lot of trees/sugar
    plenty of trees/sugar
    In formal academic writing, it is usually better to use many and much rather than phrases such as a lot of, most of and plenty of.


    On the above basis;
    A. Many (A large quantity of) positive results (result is countable noun, so phrases with words such as quantity or amount are inappropriate)
    B. A great number of positive results (This is correct)
    C. A large amount of positive results Incorrect


    How informative and comprehensive!!

    Thanks you Ms Sarat

    Money considered countable?
    But why usually we ask: How much does this cost?
    A little of money....





    Indeed, I think most of the people is confusing about the "a lot of ...", "a lots of....".




    Thanks for Ms Sarat,
    Fairylord

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    #4

    Exclamation Re: A xxxx of results?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fairylord View Post
    Money considered countable? No, see explanation below.
    But why usually we ask: How much does this cost? cost is also uncout noun.
    A little (of) money.... No, A little money

    Fairylord
    Money, cost are uncountable, because they refer to the AMOUNT of Money and not a bundle of currencies or a handful of coins as you assume. It has a singular form and always takes a singular verb
    Money is power & not Moneys are power.. I've got some money. She has a little money
    I was able to buy the damaged goods at cost (= for only the amount of money needed to produce or get the goods, without any extra money added for profit).
    Of course, you can count money in currency (which is countable as well as uncountable) such as: in dollars or yen or pounds

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    #5

    Re: A xxxx of results?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fairylord View Post
    How informative and comprehensive!!

    ....

    Careful with 'couple', Fairylord. 'A couple things' (Am English - perhaps not throughout the US, I wouldn't know); but 'a couple of things' (Br English and many regional varieties - NZ English, for example [to judge form Raymott's contribution to another thread].

    In this case, why not use just 'Many' or 'A great/very many'? And if you're unsure about using quantifiers (there's a lot to think about ) there are various nouns you can use. Look in a thesaurus under 'multitude' (although this is itself not a worry free noun, as 'a multitude of people' can be referred to as 'a multitude' - and even, with regard to a particular one, just 'the multitude'*) or 'plethora'** - those two should find you all the possible synonyms.

    b
    * Perhaps this is rather Biblical. I remember from Sunday school that Jesus was forever 'speaking to the multitude'
    ** Only for use in vary formal writing

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