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  1. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #1

    Question Bushing Auntie (the BBC under fire)

    The BBC under fire
    Bashing Auntie
    I read an article titled The BBC under fire, Bashing Auntie from Economist. Here's the URL link about it.
    The BBC under fire: Bashing Auntie | The Economist

    Is 'Auntie' the nickname of the BBC? Why did the journalist say 'bashing auntuie'?

    Thanks!

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    #2

    Re: Bushing Auntie (the BBC under fire)

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    I read an article titled The BBC under fire, Bashing Auntie from Economist. Here's the URL link about it.
    The BBC under fire: Bashing Auntie | The Economist

    Is 'Auntie' the nickname of the BBC? Yes. Why did the journalist say 'bashing auntuie'? 'Bashing' can be used to mean 'harshly criticizing.'

    Thanks!
    Best wishes,

    Petra

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Bushing Auntie (the BBC under fire)

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    I read an article titled The BBC under fire, Bashing Auntie from Economist. Here's the URL link about it.
    The BBC under fire: Bashing Auntie | The Economist

    Is 'Auntie' the nickname of the BBC? Why did the journalist say 'bashing auntuie'?

    Thanks!
    Yes, we also use "Auntie" to mean the ABC in Australia - obviously a direct steal, although perhaps most of the early shows on the ABC actually came from the BBC.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Bushing Auntie (the BBC under fire)

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Yes, we also use "Auntie" to mean the ABC in Australia - obviously a direct steal, although perhaps most of the early shows on the ABC actually came from the BBC.
    Decades after a (BBC, I think) programme called The Man from UNCLE (a spy drama featuring operations of the UN Commission for Law Enforcement [or some such made up body]), Ben Elton hosted a BBC comedy show called The Man from Auntie. (The point was that he had previously worked for one of the commercial channels.)

    b

  4. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Bushing Auntie (the BBC under fire)

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Decades after a (BBC, I think) programme called The Man from UNCLE (a spy drama featuring operations of the UN Commission for Law Enforcement [or some such made up body]), Ben Elton hosted a BBC comedy show called The Man from Auntie. (The point was that he had previously worked for one of the commercial channels.)

    b

    Thank you, everyone.

    BobK, do you mean The Man from Auntie was so popular that the BBC won the nickname Auntie since that? I don't understand what you mean.

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Bushing Auntie (the BBC under fire)

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Thank you, everyone.

    BobK, do you mean The Man from Auntie was so popular that the BBC won the nickname Auntie since that? I don't understand what you mean.
    No. The nickname had been around for years. The naming of the series just shows how well-known the nickname was.

    b

  6. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Bushing Auntie (the BBC under fire)

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    No. The nickname had been around for years. The naming of the series just shows how well-known the nickname was.

    b
    Thank you again, BobK.

    Do you know why the BBC is called Auntie?

  7. BobK's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Bushing Auntie (the BBC under fire)

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Thank you again, BobK.

    Do you know why the BBC is called Auntie?
    No idea Perhaps it's something to do with its attitude to 'correctness' - especially in the '40s-'60s; you couldn't say 'bloody' on the BBC until quite recently - in fact the writers of many comedy shows of that time used to delight in 'smuggling through' unacceptable language. The BBC was someone with whom you had to be on your best behaviour - as when an aunt came to tea!

    From the other point of view (not policeman but carer) there used to be a radio programme called Listen With Mother (and TV programmes aimed specifically at children, and even more recently a digital TV channel devoted to children's interests - 'CBeebies') - and sitting children down in front of these is the equivalent of a sort of cheap baby-sitter (like leaving them with their aunt).

    There may be a specific reason for the name (in which case I'm sure someone will tell me). But even without one, the word works for me, with implications of authority, safeness, correctness, care...

    b


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    #9

    Re: Bushing Auntie (the BBC under fire)

    It very possibly goes back to the 1920s, when there were so many women who lost their men in the Great War and thus a great many "Aunties" to keep the children on the straight and narrow by their good advice and example.

  8. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Bushing Auntie (the BBC under fire)

    That's probably true as a popularization of the term "auntie", but I don't think it was attached to the Beeb until the sixties, after the Man from UNCLE.

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