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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 363
    #1

    Except for/Without

    Michael Swan writes in his Practical English Usage, "Except (for) is only used to talk about exceptions to generalisations. In other cases, without or but for may be preferable. Compare:
    Without/But for your help, I would have failed.
    (NOT Except for your help, I would have failed.)"

    Do native speakers of English in their casual conversation care about the above rule?
    If I say, "Except for your help, I would have failed," does it sound strange to native speakers of English?

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,623
    #2

    Re: Except for/Without

    Quote Originally Posted by Snappy View Post
    Michael Swan writes in his Practical English Usage, "Except (for) is only used to talk about exceptions to generalisations. In other cases, without or but for may be preferable. Compare:
    Without/But for your help, I would have failed.
    (NOT Except for your help, I would have failed.)"

    Do native speakers of English in their casual conversation care about the above rule?
    If I say, "Except for your help, I would have failed," does it sound strange to native speakers of English?
    It sounds strange to this English speaker.

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