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    #1

    Why is "Sir" used here?

    Hello Everyone,

    I would like to know here why is "sir" used in the following sentence. Is it a title?


    The discovery gave a big boost to the nascent Green movement. "Sir" Jonathon Porritt cites the “deep and lasting effect” that Apollo had on “many environmentalists — including me”

    Regards

    Sky


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    #2

    Re: Why is "Sir" used here?

    Disclaimer:I'm no teacher.

    Yes, it's a title used for baronets and knights.

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    #3

    Re: Why is "Sir" used here?

    Quote Originally Posted by sky753 View Post
    Hello Everyone,

    I would like to know here why is "sir" used in the following sentence. Is it a title?


    The discovery gave a big boost to the nascent Green movement. "Sir" Jonathon Porritt cites the “deep and lasting effect” that Apollo had on “many environmentalists — including me”

    Regards

    Sky
    Hello, I give you an answer,

    type this on the web: Jonathon Porritt - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    If you do not can, tell me. I know sometimes China cut the access to Internet link.

    Have a nice day.


    • Join Date: Apr 2009
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    #4

    Re: Why is "Sir" used here?

    Yes, it's an honorary title.

    Greg

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Why is "Sir" used here?

    Quote Originally Posted by sky753 View Post
    ...
    The discovery gave a big boost to the nascent Green movement. "Sir" Jonathon Porritt cites the “deep and lasting effect” that Apollo had on “many environmentalists — including me”

    Regards

    Sky
    A bit of background information ('context' - but not just written context' would explain why the writer used quotation marks. Some people - confusingly - use them to mark emphasis (where italics or underline would be clearer). So they could mean either of these:
    • 'Sir JP' [that is, implicit correction of another writer's omission, or a reminder of an honour that may have been forgotten]
    • '"Sir" JP' [with the implicit mockery of someone's insistence on using the title - either JP or someone else. My wife uses this sort of quotation whenever she refers to '"Sir" Ian Botham '
    • '"Sir" JP' [with an implicit - and mistaken - 'correction' of fact]
    • '"Sir" JP' [another mistake, implying "He hasn't been knighted but he should be" - at least, this is a mistake if Wikipedia is to be believed]
    • ...


    Lots of possible meanings...

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 29-Sep-2009 at 18:32. Reason: Format

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