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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    Using the word at

    I have a question. When using the word at in a sentence I am either confusing myself or overthinking the word? In this sentence, "During the actual observation, what her focus is on and what key items she looks at." have I used at incorrectly? I keep thinking that the word at signifies a specific location, but I don't know and so here I am asking.


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
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    #2

    Re: Using the word at

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    I have a question. When using the word at in a sentence I am either confusing myself or overthinking the word? In this sentence, "During the actual observation, what her focus is on and what key items she looks at." have I used at incorrectly? I keep thinking that the word at signifies a specific location, but I don't know and so here I am asking.
    Sounds okay to me.

    "To look at" means "to observe," so she was looking AT whatever her focus was on.

    The phrase is not a sentence, however, so that may be contributing to your feeling that there's something wrong.

    During the actual observation, the researchers keep careful notes of what her focus is on and what key items she looks at.

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