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    #1

    impetus/stimulus/motive/incitement

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to share with me your opinion concerning the feasibility of the following sentences?

    The President's strong recommendation provided the impetus needed to pass the campaign reform bill.
    The treaty will give an impetus to trade.
    There were no impetus to work harder.
    He was under the stimulus of the narcotic.
    Ambition is his only stimulus.
    She had no motive to commit the crime.
    The police could not find a motive for the murder.
    We have to question their motives.
    What is the motive behind the bombing?
    Water provides the motive power that operates the mill.
    The salary was augmented so liberally as to motive his migration.
    His malice must be motivated in some satisfactory way in the play.
    I did it from the best motive.
    From the long records of a distant age, derive incitements to renew thy rage.
    Incitement to racial or ethnic hatred is a crime uder the laws of a number of countries.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

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    #2

    Re: impetus/stimulus/motive/incitement

    There were no impetus to work harder.- was? It's normally singular or uncountable, though Webster's and the American Heritage both give 'impetuses' as the plural, which I can't say I can remember hearing. Cambridge and Oxford don't, so it might be a difference between the variants.
    He was under the stimulus of the narcotic. - This doesn't collocate for me- people are more commonly under the influence of alcohol, drugs, etc. Also, I think it would be more natural to name the drug as the definite article imp-lies that the writer knows which one it was rather than using narcotic.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,845
    #3

    Re: impetus/stimulus/motive/incitement

    There were no impetus to work harder.- was? It's normally singular or uncountable, though Webster's and the American Heritage both give 'impetuses' as the plural, which I can't say I can remember hearing. Cambridge and Oxford don't, so it might be a difference between the variants.
    He was under the stimulus of the narcotic. - This doesn't collocate for me- people are more commonly under the influence of alcohol, drugs, etc. Also, I think it would be more natural to name the drug as the definite article imp-lies that the writer knows which one it was rather than using narcotic.

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