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    #1

    stem from

    Does the sentence below make sense? Is the use of "stem from" correct?

    The sweeping social phenomenon Facebook has come to be stems from several factors: ...

    Thanks.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: stem from

    It's just decipherable, but very hard to parse, because the subject ('The sweeping social phenomenon Facebook has come to be') only implies the real subject of the verb 'stems from', which is 'the growth and/or the rate of growth'.

    As it is, the words 'has come to be stems' invite a meaningless misinterpretation of 'stems' as a noun. When writing, you need to think of the amount of work you are asking your readers to do. In the words of ... (maybe Sheridan):

    'We write with ease to show our breeding;
    But easy writing's curs'd hard reading.'

    b

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    #3

    Re: stem from

    Do you think the meaning would be clearer if I replaced "stems" with "derives"?

    The sweeping social phenomenon Facebook has come to be derives from several factors:

    Thanks.

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    #4

    Re: stem from

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    Do you think the meaning would be clearer if I replaced "stems" with "derives"?

    The sweeping social phenomenon Facebook has come to be derives from several factors:

    Thanks.
    No, the problem comes from "(that) has come to be". You have two apparent verbal components in a row. Obviously the reader will expect the first one to be the verb:
    Facebook has come to be very popular (or similar). But instead we get:
    Facebook has come to be derives ...

    "(The sweeping social phenomenon) Facebook" is the apparent subject, but in fact the subject turns out to be 'phenomenon' not 'Facebook'

    Maybe
    The sweeping social phenomenon that Facebook has come to be derives ...

  3. #5

    Re: stem from

    I agree with Raymott. I suggest that you attempt to rephrase the sentence altogether to eliminate the phrase has come to be. What do you mean by sweeping social phenomenon ? Could you rephrase your idea to "the popularity of Facebook derives from ..." ?

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    #6

    Re: stem from

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    Does the sentence below make sense? Is the use of "stem from" correct?

    The sweeping social phenomenon Facebook has come to be stems from several factors: ...

    Thanks.
    The sweeping social phenomenon Facebook has come to be, stems from several factors: ...

    Please correct me if I am missing something obvious (quite likely these days) but wouldn't simple punctuation solve the problem, as above?

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: stem from

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    The sweeping social phenomenon Facebook has come to be, stems from several factors: ...

    Please correct me if I am missing something obvious (quite likely these days) but wouldn't simple punctuation solve the problem, as above?
    It would make the problem less painful, but it's a sticking plaster not a cure; the subject is 'growth' or 'popularity', not 'phenomenon'.

    b

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