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  1. anupumh's Avatar
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    #1

    Post Usage of whom is obselete

    Hi,

    Is this correct in spoken English?

    Whom is not used anymore and instead we say "Who".

    Thanks

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    #2

    Re: Usage of whom is obselete

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Hi,

    Is this correct in spoken English?

    Whom is not used anymore and instead we say "Who".

    Thanks
    Take a look at: https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a...ho-x-whom.html


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    #3

    Wink Re: Usage of whom is obselete

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Hi,

    Is this correct in spoken English?

    Whom is not used anymore and instead we say "Who".

    Thanks
    In most spoken language contexts, native speakers of English do not give attention to the distinction between "who" and "whom". In more formal contexts, such as prepared speeches, one is more likely to hear "whom". In most formal writing that pertains to business, law, and government, for example, one is likely to read "whom". Given the formality of "whom" and the fact that the vast majority of native speakers don't use "whom" in most ordinary and everyday language, "whom" can sound rather stuffy and inappropriate to many native speakers of English. If you think using "whom" in a sentence such as "I don't know to whom I spoke at the box office." will help you sound as though you're speaking better English, you're mistaken. There's nothing wrong with saying, "I don't know who I spoke to at the box office." Using "whom" in ordinary communication will likely make you sound overly formal, and maybe even pretentious, to many people. It's true that there are those who do use "whom" regularly. However, they are most definitely a small minority of native speakers of English.

    PROESL's Usage Note on "Whom"

    It could be highfalutin language. http://www.answers.com/topic/highfalutin

    REGIONAL NOTE H.L. Mencken, in his famous book The American Language, mentions highfalutin as an example of the many native U.S. words coined during the 19th-century period of vigorous growth.
    Last edited by PROESL; 01-Oct-2009 at 05:53.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Usage of whom is obselete

    You might want to look into the use of the word 'obselescent', anupumh.

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    #5

    Re: Usage of whom is obselete

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Hi,

    Is this correct in spoken English?

    Whom is not used anymore and instead we say "Who".

    Thanks
    In most cases, yes, but not all; many people will still use it if it comes after a preposition, though in general conversation this doesn't happen that often. It can also be used for effect to make something sound more serious, formal, legal, etc. Nowadays very few people in BrE make the who/whom distinction all the time in speech.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Usage of whom is obselete

    And it exists without the remotest possibility of 'modernization' in some set phrases, such as 'to whom it may concern'. That just couldn't be 'to who it may concern' , though people who are allergic to inflected pronouns might paraphrase to something like 'for anyone who's interested'.

    b


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    #7

    Re: Usage of whom is obselete

    I try to stay away from "to whom it may concern".

  4. anupumh's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Usage of whom is obselete

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    I try to stay away from "to whom it may concern".
    then what do you write/use instead?


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    #9

    Re: Usage of whom is obselete

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    then what do you write/use instead?
    Dear Colleague - This is one possibility.

    It depends on the letter. Another possibility is "Dear Neighbor".

    Other possibilities: Dear Sir, Dear Madam, Gentlemen, Ladies and Gentlemen

    You can simply address it to a title, or just decide what is best as each situation presents itself.

    Esteemed Colleagues, Dear Board of Directors, Human Resources Director, Training Manager, etcetera

    I think readers of "to whom it may concern" skip right over it. They read it, but for practical persons they don't give it much attention. People care about the content, not things like salutations and adhering to things like "block style".


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    #10

    Re: Usage of whom is obselete

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Hi,

    Is this correct in spoken English?

    Whom is not used anymore and instead we say "Who".

    Thanks
    The grammar of this sentence is correct.

    Its contents, however, are factually inaccurate, since there are still occasions in formal usage when 'whom' is required (most notably, directly after a preposition).

    I presume that your enquiry was with regard to the latter...

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