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    #1

    new or newly

    new-built? or newly-built ? or both are O.K? What's the difference?

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    #2

    Re: new or newly

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnDick View Post
    new-built? or newly-built ? or both are O.K? What's the difference?

    Hello,

    I think the both can be adverbs, but you must write the second without hyphen like this 'newly built'.

    Maybe the difference is the meaning, but it's not my native tongue, and I am not a teacher.

    Hope it's help you a little.

    Have a nice day.

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    #3

    Exclamation Re: new or newly

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnDick View Post
    new-built? or newly-built ? or both are O.K? What's the difference?
    ‘Built’ is the past participle form of the verb build and is used as a modifier to describe a specified physical build/consruction:
    She is a slightly built woman.
    He is a tall and well-built person
    Now see the difference. In the first sentence the adjective built is modified by the adverb ‘slightly’. Whereas in the second sentence ‘well-built’ is a single unit functioning as adjective.
    Similarly, you can say;
    This is a newly built house.
    These new-built structures have come up recently.
    So when you use an adverb the words are separate and that is the rule but when used as a single unit modifier with another word a hyphen(-) is used. It is a practice to use a hyphen between words combined to form a unit modifier that precedes the word modified. This applies particularly to combinations in which one element is a present or past participle. You have a lot of examples of this type of single unit modifiers such as: well-adjusted, well-advised, in-built, new-planted etc
    The valleylooks green with new-planted crops.

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    #4

    Re: new or newly

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    ‘Built’ is the past participle form of the verb build and is used as a modifier to describe a specified physical build/consruction:
    She is a slightly built woman.
    He is a tall and well-built person
    Now see the difference. In the first sentence the adjective built is modified by the adverb ‘slightly’. Whereas in the second sentence ‘well-built’ is a single unit functioning as adjective.
    Similarly, you can say;
    This is a newly built house.
    These new-built structures have come up recently.
    So when you use an adverb the words are separate and that is the rule but when used as a single unit modifier with another word a hyphen(-) is used. It is a practice to use a hyphen between words combined to form a unit modifier that precedes the word modified. This applies particularly to combinations in which one element is a present or past participle. You have a lot of examples of this type of single unit modifiers such as: well-adjusted, well-advised, in-built, new-planted etc
    The valleylooks green with new-planted crops.
    Hi,
    So can I say
    This is a newly built houes. = This is a new-built house.
    Are they the same?

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: new or newly

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnDick View Post
    Hi,
    So can I say
    This is a newly built houes. = This is a new-built house.
    Are they the same?
    You can get away with either. "Newly is better"
    After all, we say a "newborn baby" to mean a "newly born baby".
    But I wouldn't use "newbuilt."

  2. Soup's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: new or newly

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnDick View Post
    new-built? or newly-built ? or both are O.K? What's the difference?
    I agree with the other posters:

    a new-built house

    a newly built house

    The difference is one of dialect. The phrase a new-built house is British English.

    _____________
    new from Old English of-niowe, Middle English, anew; a new-built house means a house built anew, a newly built house.

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