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  1. terrenziqq's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
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    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 64
    #1

    as long as...

    Tony is 185 cm tall.
    Jerry is 185 cm tall.
    -->Tony is as tall as Jerry.
    The coastline of island A is 2000 miles long.
    The coastline of island B is 2000 miles long.
    -->>??
    So, what's the common way to say two things has the same length?
    By the way, how do you describe a person's face is long in length since the phrase "long face" doesn't mean literally?


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,131
    #2

    Re: as long as...

    Tony is 185 cm tall.
    Jerry is 185 cm tall.
    -->Tony is as tall as Jerry.
    The coastline of island A is 2000 miles long.
    The coastline of island B is 2000 miles long.
    -->>??
    So, what's the common way to say two things HAVE the same length?

    Your post's title has it right: The coastline of Island A is as long as the coastline of Island B.

    "Tall" is used mostly for items that are up-and-down (vertical) and "long" for horizontal features, but that's not a fixed rule. It's just the tendency that a speaker would likely go by without even thinking much about it.

    When you buy a ladder, the product description is:

    MATERIAL: Aluminum
    WEIGHT: 11 lb
    LENGTH: 10 feet

    So you see that we don't always say "tall" for vertical items. And once you're ON the ladder, your kid brother calls up to you, "Say! How high are you? Can I climb up that high too?"

    In this case, I think people choose "high" to indicate "distance off the ground," which is not the same as "tallness."

    When I was a kid, I was so used to measuring people for "height" that I thought it was comical when people talked about how "long" a newborn baby is -- but of course a new baby isn't vertical, not for a long time!


    By the way, how do you describe a person's face is long in length since the phrase "long face" doesn't mean literally?

    Possibly you could say they're "horse-faced" or "they have a horse face."
    But I think that the context, the surrounding words, even the tone of voice distinguish between a mere description of a face and the characterization of someone facial expression.

    "What's wrong with you? Why the long face?"

    "The teacher had a long, pale face, with a high forehead and a long chin. His face looked even longer because his hairline had receded."

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