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    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 5
    #1

    An example from the dictionary

    I checked the word ''dismiss''
    and there is an example that i couldn't understand:
    ''Vegetarians are no longer dismissed as cranks''
    Is it ok if the word ''dismissed'' is being replaced by the word ''regarded''?
    because the sentence doesn't seem to make sense ,but I'm not sure.
    Please help ,thanks.

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    #2

    Re: An example from the dictionary

    You are on the right track.

    To "regard" someone is generally assumed to mean we hold their opinions on a high level. One might "regard" a vegetarian as one who respects wildlife. However, when we "dismiss" someone's opinions, we actualy show disregard. We used to think that vegetarians were cranks (silly fools). We no longer "dismiss" them as cranks. We now "regard" them as sensible eaters.


    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 5
    #3

    Re: An example from the dictionary

    I think the main problem is the word ''no longer''
    ''no longer dismiss'' sounds like double negative or sth?
    Should it be ''Vegetarians are now dismissed as cranks'' instead of no longer?
    Thanks again!


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #4

    Re: An example from the dictionary

    You have to be able to perceive the larger picture. At one time, people who were "faddy" about their food were dismissed socially as being "cranks" - and therefore a nuisance. Everyone ate meat, and those who did not [George Bernard Shaw is a classic example] were seen as being odd.

    Preferred dietary choices are no longer regarded as "cranky", so "vegetarianism" is no longer dismissed.

  1. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: An example from the dictionary

    So they are no longer excluded or mocked.

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