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    #1

    Question idiomatic or not

    I know it is right to say: make (good / better/ full) use of every minute or make the most of every minute. But is it also idiomatic to say :make the most use of every minute?


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    #2

    Re: idiomatic or not

    I know it is right to say: make (good / better/ full) use of every minute or make the most of every minute. But is it also idiomatic to say :make the most use of every minute?
    The phrase to make the most use of every minute isn't idiomatic; it's wrong. Nobody would say that.

    You seem to be suggesting that the first phrase is idiomatic as well. I wouldn't say so, although it is correct.

    Greg

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    #3

    Re: idiomatic or not

    Thank you very much! But how can I put it idiomatically?


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    #4

    Re: idiomatic or not

    But how can I put it idiomatically?
    You need to find an idiom that expresses the idea that you should make the best use of every minute. It would help if you had a certain context in mind, because I am hard pressed to think of one that expresses that exact idea. For example, if time is critical and running short, you might say "the clock is ticking," or it's "crunch time." I can't really think of one that precisely captures your idea, though.

    Incidentally, native speakers frequently bicker about what is and what is not an idiom. From the Collins Cobuild English Dictionary: "An idiom is a group of words which have a different meaning when used together from the one they would have if you took the meaning of each word individually." In other words, suppose someone says "It's raining cats and dogs." Well, you know what dogs are. You know what cats are. You know what rain is. But you still don't understand exactly what the speaker is actually trying to say. That's an idiom.

    Greg

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    #5

    Re: idiomatic or not

    I mean life is short, and we shouldn't waste our time doing nothing at all, for time is life.

    The original phrase is written by someone else who exclaims that he is so good at English that he has already published several books in English in America, but still, I doubt its corrctness.Since I haven't seen the phrase"make the most use of" in my reading (by the way, reading is the only way I learn English,as most Chinese learners do),I put the thread here.

    If I were him, I would put it in these ways:
    1)We should make full use of our time
    2)We should make the most of our time.

    Am I right? Have you any better ideas?

    Thank you

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    #6

    Re: idiomatic or not

    Hi,dragn

    I'm not a teacher nor a native-English speaker.

    I think fire's definition of "idiomatic" here would be something like "When a certain pharase or sentence seems quite natural to native-English speakers' ear, it is idiomatic."

    I myself used "idiomatic" in such way, and I've learned the true definition of "idiom" such as "it rains cats and dogs" and I understand now that I was wrong. Thank you for your advice.

    Now I'd like to know what adjectve instead of idiomatic I should use, when I want to express sounding-natural-to-native-English-speakers'-ear.
    Last edited by Enjoyglish; 05-Oct-2009 at 10:24.

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    #7

    Re: idiomatic or not

    I'm not a teacher.

    Hi fire,

    Here are my 2 cents concerning the matter of question.

    1/ Utilize fully the time you have./
    2/ Make the best use of the time you have./

    Regards,

    V.

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    #8

    Re: idiomatic or not

    Thank you for your answer, Vil.

    I'm learning English with a view to communicating with others. As you have probably known, Shanghai will host the next EXPO. By then, a lot of foreigners will visit Shanghai, I hope I can do something for them.

    By the way, what language do you speak? Is English your mother tongue?

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    #9

    Re: idiomatic or not

    Hi fire,

    Thank you for your interesting information about next EXPO. It’s something to be proud. I am looking through “green” glasses of you.

    My native language is Bulgarian – a many thousand year old language. (please see Bulgarian language: Information from Answers.com)

    Besides I have a fairy good command of German and Russian. The last a few years I begun to turn my attention to English language.

    Regards,

    V.

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