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    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 29
    #1

    in vs at

    My respected teachers

    (It's me 'twilit'.I had to change my username for some reasons.)

    (1)
    "She asked me whether I loved her or not.I said in reply that I don't want to tell you OR I didn't want to tell you." Which one is correct?

    (2)
    I'm in school now.
    I was at school when you phoned me this morning.
    I'm in a meeting now.
    I was in meeting when you phoned me this morning.
    I'm in a party now.
    I was in a pary when you phoned me this mornign.
    If we are present.We have to use ''in'' and if not then ''at'', right?

    Thank you!


    • Join Date: Jan 2008
    • Posts: 57
    #2

    Re: in vs at

    Quote Originally Posted by untaught View Post
    My respected teachers

    (It's me 'twilit'.I had to change my username for some reasons.)

    (1)
    "She asked me whether I loved her or not.I said in reply that I don't want to tell you OR I didn't want to tell you." Which one is correct?

    (2)
    I'm in school now.
    I was at school when you phoned me this morning.
    I'm in a meeting now.
    I was in meeting when you phoned me this morning.
    I'm in a party now.
    I was in a pary when you phoned me this mornign.
    If we are present.We have to use ''in'' and if not then ''at'', right?

    Thank you!
    I am not a teacher, but I work in my native language of English.

    You can not generalize between "in" and "at." It is a matter of current practice, and I don't know how to impart the experience needed to decide. There are no rules that I know of.

    To be "in" school can mean either that you are physically in the school, or that you are enrolled in courses AT a school.

    To be "at" school means that you are physically at the school right now, or were at the school when your answer says.

    You are always "in" a meeting, never "at" a meeting. However, you can be "at" a convention or a conference. You can be "in" a conference, but you can never be "in" a convention. It's confusing.

    You are always "at" a party, never "in" a party.

    Your last sentence is not always true - it depends on the circumstances and the context, and current practice in English. I do not think there is a rule of any kind.


    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 49
    #3

    Re: in vs at

    Quote Originally Posted by cclaff View Post
    I am not a teacher, but I work in my native language of English.

    You can not generalize between "in" and "at." It is a matter of current practice, and I don't know how to impart the experience needed to decide. There are no rules that I know of.

    To be "in" school can mean either that you are physically in the school, or that you are enrolled in courses AT a school.

    To be "at" school means that you are physically at the school right now, or were at the school when your answer says.

    You are always "in" a meeting, never "at" a meeting. However, you can be "at" a convention or a conference. You can be "in" a conference, but you can never be "in" a convention. It's confusing.

    You are always "at" a party, never "in" a party.

    Your last sentence is not always true - it depends on the circumstances and the context, and current practice in English. I do not think there is a rule of any kind.

    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a...105748-vs.html

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