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  1. outofdejavu's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile "Trouble with caps"

    Regarding the idiom
    with a capital A/B etc.
    said after the name of a particular quality to say that it is very strong, using its first letter
    He's trouble with a capital T!

    Source: Definition of with a capital A/B etc. from Cambridge Dictionary Online
    If I want to emphasize how strong a particular quality of a person is, can I say:

    He's trouble with caps! => In writing, I mean "He's TROUBLE!"
    He's a jerk with caps! => In writing, I mean "He's a JERK!"


    Are they intelligible in speech?



    Sincerely,

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "Trouble with caps"

    Quote Originally Posted by outofdejavu View Post
    Regarding the idiom
    If I want to emphasize how strong a particular quality of a person is, can I say:

    He's trouble with caps! => In writing, I mean "He's TROUBLE!"
    He's a jerk with caps! => In writing, I mean "He's a JERK!"
    This is not good writing, at least in the traditional sense. You will not see a published book, for example, with capitals used for emphasis.
    The way to stress a word is by the use of italics.
    In writing, I mean "He's trouble!"

    Are they intelligible in speech?
    I've never heard of them. The idiom is "He's trouble with a capital 'T'".
    (By the way, that implies 'Trouble', not 'TROUBLE').
    If you said "He's trouble with caps!", I'd have to ask you what you meant.
    Sincerely,
    R.

  3. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "Trouble with caps"

    The AmE expression is "with a capital X" for example, "He's a jerk with a capital J."

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