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  1. phorntita's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Feb 2009
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    #1

    live up to

    I wonder whether these expressions are perfectly understood or need some more sentences at the end to be better understanding. Advise me please.
    1)The weather of England is living up to its reputation.
    Or The weather of England is living up to its reputation that............
    2) They're living up to their extraordinary reputations.
    Or They're living up to their extraordinary reputations that............


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,131
    #2

    Re: live up to

    Quote Originally Posted by phorntita View Post
    I wonder whether these expressions are perfectly understood or need some more sentences at the end to be better understanding. Advise me please.
    1)The weather of England is living up to its reputation.
    Or The weather of England is living up to its reputation that............
    2) They're living up to their extraordinary reputations.
    Or They're living up to their extraordinary reputations that............
    Not necessarily would these sentences need more, and they certainly don't require more in terms of grammar.

    The only issue is whether or not your reader shares enough of a common background of information and opinion with you.

    For example, the weather in London is notoriously bad, and this is a well-known fact. Therefore, many many people could be expected to get it when you just REFER to the weather's reputation -- there'd be no special need to reiterate a widely-understood fact.

    But if I were to say to you, "Well, my friend Jesse is certainly living up to his reputation!" you could hardly be expected to know what that reputation is. How would you know about the reputation of a person you never even heard of before?

    I would have to add, "He has always been the most reckless driver I know ... and now he got into a car crash!"

    On the other hand, if you and I had talked about Jesse's bad driving many times, then it would be logical for me to write a note to you that just said, "Jesse's sure living up to his reputation!"

    You would know what I meant because you and I would have information in common about Jesse and his reputation. So there would be no need for me to explain it. Possibly you would write back, "Oh no! Don't tell me he got into another car crash! He's going to KILL himself one fine day!"
    Last edited by Ann1977; 05-Oct-2009 at 03:20.

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