Results 1 to 4 of 4
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 363
    #1

    Very exhausted or quite exhausted

    Some Japanese English teachers say (a) is wrong and (b) is correct, but I do not understand why (a) is wrong.


    (a) I'm very exhausted. (b) I'm quite exhausted.


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 3,059
    #2

    Re: Very exhausted or quite exhausted

    Quote Originally Posted by Snappy View Post
    Some Japanese English teachers say (a) is wrong and (b) is correct, but I do not understand why (a) is wrong.


    (a) I'm very exhausted. (b) I'm quite exhausted.
    I wonder why those teachers haven't explained why it's "wrong", Snappy.

    "very" doesn't always work as an intensifier. I'd say that the more natural use is "really exhausted".

  1. anupumh's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,110
    #3

    Re: Very exhausted or quite exhausted

    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    I wonder why those teachers haven't explained why it's "wrong", Snappy.

    "very" doesn't always work as an intensifier. I'd say that the more natural use is "really exhausted".
    Can we use, "I am extremly exhausted" or "I am totally exhausted"..?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,912
    #4

    Re: Very exhausted or quite exhausted

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Can we use, "I am extremly exhausted" or "I am totally exhausted"..?
    Yes, you can. We don't use 'very' with non-gradable adjectives. You're supposedly either exhausted or not. It's hard to be 'a little dead', but I don't think that this one is a particularly clear-cut example of a non-gradable adjective and there are plenty of examples of 'a little exhausted' being used. To me, it's one of the adjectives in the grey area between gradable and non-gradable.

Similar Threads

  1. Even though he was exhausted, ….
    By fire fly in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-Jul-2009, 10:36
  2. was/had been exhausted and owed (for) medical expenses
    By Tan Elaine in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 23-Apr-2009, 05:24

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •