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  1. phorntita's Avatar
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    #1

    busman's holiday

    Could I have different more ideas about the meaning of this idiom" busman's holiday" in this sentence?
    The fire crew's Christmas outing has turned into a busman's holiday when their coach caught fire.
    Does it mean that because their coach caught fire so they couldn't go on their Christmas holiday but had to do sth else like fixing their coach and sth else? And we call this period of their time a busman's holiday.
    PS Could I have some brief history of this idiom as well? ( about 2-3 sentences, if possible) Thank you in advance.

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: busman's holiday

    It's a BrE expression meaning a good holiday, but an inexpensive one.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: busman's holiday

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    It's a BrE expression meaning a good holiday, but an inexpensive one.
    It doesn't mean that kon, it means doing much the same on holiday as you do at work. A bus driver who goes on a coach tour for his holiday, for example.


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    #4

    Re: busman's holiday

    That's right. It means that you end up doing on your time off the same thing you do for work. For whatever reason (sometimes willy-nilly, sometimes for fun, sometimes from a sense of duty), you just can't stay away.


    Here's one theory regarding the origin of this expression:

    "There are a few different theories on the origin of the phrase "busman's holiday". The version most commonly accepted hearkens back to the horse-driven omnibuses of 19th Century England.

    "The drivers of these omnibuses often grew very attached to their particular team of horses pulling their carriage through town. During their days off, many of these omnibus drivers would disguise themselves as regular passengers in order to keep a critical eye on the relief drivers and the horses.

    "It is said that the phrase "busman's holiday" arose from this practice of bus drivers spending their downtime riding the buses"
    http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-busmans-holiday.htm



    Examples:

    For fun: "An ESL teacher on vacation who is answering posts on UsingEnglish is taking a busman's holiday."

    Willy-nilly: "When Dorothy Sayers' famed fictional detective Lord Peter Wimsey went on his honeymoon, it became a "busman's honeymoon" after a murder was discovered."
    Busman's Honeymoon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    From a sense of duty: "The owner of the pizza parlor didn't trust the assistant manager, so his days off were regular busman's holidays. He haunted the place checking up on everything."
    Last edited by Ann1977; 07-Oct-2009 at 18:46.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: busman's holiday

    And so, by extension: the fire crew had to fight the fire that resulted when their bus caught fire. No holiday for them: they had to do what they do every day.


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    #6

    Re: busman's holiday

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    And so, by extension: the fire crew had to fight the fire that resulted when their bus caught fire. No holiday for them: they had to do what they do every day.
    Exactly!

    Wish I had phrased it as well as that. : )

  5. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: busman's holiday

    Thanks guys. When I was a kid we used to watch a show on the BBC called Busman's holiday. I guess I misunderstood it.

  6. phorntita's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: busman's holiday

    Here's one theory regarding the origin of this expression:

    "There are a few different theories on the origin of the phrase "busman's holiday". The version most commonly accepted hearkens back to the horse-driven omnibuses of 19th Century England.

    "The drivers of these omnibuses often grew very attached to their particular team of horses pulling their carriage through town. During their days off, many of these omnibus drivers would disguise themselves as regular passengers in order to keep a critical eye on the relief drivers and the horses.

    "It is said that the phrase "busman's holiday" arose from this practice of bus drivers spending their downtime riding the buses"
    What is a Busman's Holiday?



    Examples:

    For fun: "An ESL teacher on vacation who is answering posts on UsingEnglish is taking a busman's holiday."

    Willy-nilly: "When Dorothy Sayers' famed fictional detective Lord Peter Wimsey went on his honeymoon, it became a "busman's honeymoon" after a murder was discovered."
    Busman's Honeymoon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    From a sense of duty: "The owner of the pizza parlor didn't trust the assistant manager, so his days off were regular busman's holidays. He haunted the place checking up on everything."[/QUOTE]
    Thank you Annie, These ideas are both informative & entertaining

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