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    #1

    iron out

    I can solve the problem.
    I can iron out the problem.

    Do they have the same meaning?
    Are they both correct in english usage?

  1. anupumh's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: iron out

    Quote Originally Posted by kelvin123 View Post
    I can solve the problem.
    I can iron out the problem.

    Do they have the same meaning?
    Are they both correct in english usage?
    Yes they mean the same...
    Iron out - English Phrasal Verb - UsingEnglish.com
    iron out - definition of iron out by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

    Main Entry: iron out
    Part of Speech: verb
    Definition: reconcile a situation
    Synonyms: agree, arbitrate, clear up, compromise, eliminate, eradicate, erase, expedite, get rid of*, harmonize, negotiate, put right, reach agreement, resolve, settle, settle differences, simplify, smooth over, sort out, straighten out, unravel
    Antonyms: make worse, mess up

    * = informal/non-formal usage


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    #3

    Re: iron out

    Quote Originally Posted by kelvin123 View Post
    I can solve the problem.
    I can iron out the problem.

    Do they have the same meaning?
    Are they both correct in english usage?
    Yes, they are both correct.

    They both mean very much the same thing.

    To "iron out" a problem suggests soothing over discord, resolving conflict, settling difficulties.

    "Solve" is more general.

    You could solve the problems that have sprung up between the Shipping Department and the Customer Service Department -- or you could "iron out" those problems.

    But you can't "iron out" a math problem; you can only "solve" it.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: iron out

    Quote Originally Posted by kelvin123 View Post
    I can solve the problem.
    I can iron out the problem.

    Do they have the same meaning?
    Are they both correct in english usage?
    Yes, they mean the same, and yes, they are both correct English usage.

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    #5

    Re: iron out

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    Yes, they are both correct.

    They both mean very much the same thing.

    To "iron out" a problem suggests soothing over discord, resolving conflict, settling difficulties.

    "Solve" is more general.

    You could solve the problems that have sprung up between the Shipping Department and the Customer Service Department -- or you could "iron out" those problems.

    But you can't "iron out" a math problem; you can only "solve" it.
    As it is the case with resolve..
    You cannot resolve a math problem, you can only solve...
    I belive "Iron out" is more close to resolve than solve.


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    #6

    Re: iron out

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    As it is the case with resolve..
    You cannot resolve a math problem, you can only solve...
    I belive "Iron out" is more close to resolve than solve.

    I use "resolve" to refer to the outcome of the process of solving a math problem -- that is, when I am thinking of the approach in its aspects of untangling knots or navigating thorny issues.

    For example, if the students had this problem:

    Factor (y - 1)⁴ - (y - 1)

    I might say, "Do this and this and so on .... and now the expression has resolved (or "has been resolved" maybe) to ....(a much simpler one.)"

    But you're right in that I probably don't usually say, "You resolve this problem by doing such and such...."

    . . . but I might
    Last edited by Ann1977; 09-Oct-2009 at 20:29.

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    #7

    Re: iron out

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    I use "resolve" to refer to the outcome of the process of solving a math problem -- that is, when I am thinking of the approach in its aspects of untangling knots or navigating thorny issues.

    For example, if the students had this problem:

    Factor (y - 1)⁴ - (y - 1)

    I might say, "Do this and this and so on .... and now the expression has resolved to ....."

    But you're right in that I probably don't usually say, "You resolve this problem by doing such and such...."

    . . . but I might
    Check this... Solve vs Resolve
    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a...s-resolve.html

    This is interesting:

    Generally, when it comes to problems, people use "solve" when it's a problem that doesn't involve a disagreement with another person. For example, if I was locked out of my house because I didn't have my keys, I would work to find a way to solve the problem by finding a way to get into my house.

    Usually the word "resolve" is used with problems that involve other people and disagreements. If there is a misunderstanding or a difference of opinion as far as how something should be done or whether or not something should be done, people work together to "resolve" the issue.

    My sense of English: 'solve' vs. 'resolve'
    Difference between solve and resolve - WordReference Forums


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    #8

    Re: iron out

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Check this... Solve vs Resolve
    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a...s-resolve.html

    This is interesting:

    Generally, when it comes to problems, people use "solve" when it's a problem that doesn't involve a disagreement with another person. For example, if I was locked out of my house because I didn't have my keys, I would work to find a way to solve the problem by finding a way to get into my house.

    Usually the word "resolve" is used with problems that involve other people and disagreements. If there is a misunderstanding or a difference of opinion as far as how something should be done or whether or not something should be done, people work together to "resolve" the issue.

    My sense of English: 'solve' vs. 'resolve'
    Difference between solve and resolve - WordReference Forums

    I guess Merriam-Webster has been taping my lectures!

    4 a : to deal with successfully : clear up <resolve doubts> <resolve a dispute>
    b
    : to find an answer to
    c : to make clear or understandable
    d
    : to find a mathematical solution of
    e
    : to split up (as a vector) into two or more components especially in assigned directions
    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/resolve


    I think if I said in class: "Don't worry. Here's how you can iron out this little difficulty," I would be personifying the math problem as a "troublesome cuss" that is bent on being cruel to students.
    Last edited by Ann1977; 09-Oct-2009 at 20:31.

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    #9

    Re: iron out

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    I guess Merriam-Webster has been taping my lectures!

    4 a : to deal with successfully : clear up <resolve doubts> <resolve a dispute>
    b
    : to find an answer to
    c : to make clear or understandable
    d
    : to find a mathematical solution of
    e
    : to split up (as a vector) into two or more components especially in assigned directions
    resolve - Definition from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary


    I think if I said in class: "Don't worry. Here's how you can iron out this little difficulty," I would be personifying the math problem as a "troublesome cuss" that is bent on being cruel to students.
    I doubt anybody using "iron out" in a Math class amongst school students...lol


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    #10

    Re: iron out

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    I doubt anybody using "iron out" in a Math class amongst school students...lol
    What do you mean? I teach math and science every day to students in a two-year college.

    If I said "Iron out this little difficulty" in math class (and heaven knows I talk a LOT), I guess I would be personifying the problem -- and taking the students' side against a mean ol' cuss of a math problem.

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