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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    Help please

    I'm from Uruguay and I have a doubt about something I saw in the t.v. :
    first situation:
    Person1: you never watch me do the weather
    Person2: I do to
    second situation:
    Person1: You have no cell phone
    person2: Do to!

    The question is, what does "do to" mean in this situation?


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,131
    #2

    Re: Help please

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    I'm from Uruguay and I have a doubt about something I saw in the t.v. :
    first situation:
    Person1: you never watch me do the weather
    Person2: I do to
    second situation:
    Person1: You have no cell phone
    person2: Do to!

    The question is, what does "do to" mean in this situation?

    The people are responding, "I do too!" (often in casual speech the word "I" is omitted, so we say "Do too!")

    It means Yes I do" in the sense of: "You are wrong. I do watch you do the weather." or "You are wrong. I do have a cell phone!"

    "Too" means "also" but I have no idea of the origin of the idiomatic use of "too" in cases like this.

    We use it a lot.
    "He doesn't love you."
    "He does too!" <-- this means "Yes he does!"

    Children get into a low-grade squabble that goes like this for long minutes:

    "You're a jerk."
    "Am not." < --- "No I'm not."
    "Are too." <--- "Yes you are."
    "Am not."
    "Are too."
    "Am not."
    "Are too."
    and so on until something happens to break this up.

    Even among adults, you might hear various forms of the expression "Do too" many times a day in casual speech, especially in conversations involving friendly banter.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,627
    #3

    Re: Help please

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    The people are responding, "I do too!" (often in casual speech the word "I" is omitted, so we say "Do too!")

    It means Yes I do" in the sense of: "You are wrong. I do watch you do the weather." or "You are wrong. I do have a cell phone!"

    "Too" means "also" but I have no idea of the origin of the idiomatic use of "too" in cases like this.

    We use it a lot.
    "He doesn't love you."
    "He does too!" <-- this means "Yes he does!"

    Children get into a low-grade squabble that goes like this for long minutes:

    "You're a jerk."
    "Am not." < --- "No I'm not."
    "Are too." <--- "Yes you are."
    "Am not."
    "Are too."
    "Am not."
    "Are too."
    and so on until something happens to break this up.

    Even among adults, you might hear various forms of the expression "Do too" many times a day in casual speech, especially in conversations involving friendly banter.
    It sounds/looks very childish to me. Maybe American adults talk like that......!


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,131
    #4

    Re: Help please

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    It sounds/looks very childish to me. Maybe American adults talk like that......!
    Well, not the moronic exchange between the children. That is a classical example of the absolute depths of childish and maddening behavior, and it is the demonstration of "Why we should not have agreed to drive for 7 hours with two kids in the back seat."

    But the expression "Do too!" is universally heard in colloquial conversation among adults. We would say it in any kind of non-serious context to mean "Yes I do" or "Yes he does" etc. as an emphatic (but playful) denial of the other person's assertion.

    Marlene: "I never talk about people behind their backs."
    Wendy: "You do too!"

    Merv: "Here. Lemme do it. You don't know how to fix that."
    Beth: "Do too!"

    Willie: "Shoot. You're not going to ask that girl for a date."
    Jonah: "Am too. Just you wait and see."

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