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  1. anupumh's Avatar
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    #1

    Question Is this sentence appropriate?

    Hi,

    Is the sentence below appropriate?


    She was met at Orly by a woman she didn't know well.

    Is the usage of 'was met' accepted?

    Wont this be better?

    She met a women at Orly whom she did not knew well.

    Thanks


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    #2

    Re: Is this sentence appropriate?

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Hi,

    Is the sentence below appropriate?


    She was met at Orly by a woman she didn't know well.

    Is the usage of 'was met' accepted?

    Wont this be better?

    She met a women at Orly whom she did not knew well.

    Thanks
    Ahhh! I see!

    "to be met" does not mean "to meet."

    A prior arrangement whereby someone will go to the airport to collect a passenger
    - to "pick them up at" the airport
    - to "meet up with" the traveler

    -- this is "She has arranged to be met at the airport" or "she was met at the airport."

    It means "She was picked up at the airport by prior arrangement."

    A: I have to fly to LAX.
    B: Are you being met?
    A: Yes, someone from the home office will pick me up.

    This use has utterly swamped the other meaning of "to meet" when it's used for airport (train station, bus depot) pickups. If you want to say that you made someone's acquaintance for the first time at an airport, you have to add some disambiguation.

    "I met my wife at the airport" means that you went there as planned and retrieved her after her flight.

    If you want to say that the first time you ever laid eyes on her was in an airport, you'd have to say something extra:
    - My wife and I met for the first time in the waiting area of Logan Airport.
    - I met the woman who would become my wife when we both tried to take the same bag off the carousel.
    - I met my wife for the very first time when we were socked in due to fog at JFK.
    Last edited by Ann1977; 11-Oct-2009 at 06:46.

  2. anupumh's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Is this sentence appropriate?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    Ahhh! I see!

    "to be met" does not mean "to meet."

    A prior arrangement whereby someone will go to the airport to collect a passenger
    - to "pick them up at" the airport
    - to "meet up with" the traveler

    -- this is "She has arranged to be met at the airport" or "she was met at the airport."

    It means "She was picked up at the airport by prior arrangement."

    A: I have to fly to LAX.
    B: Are you being met?
    A: Yes, someone from the home office will pick me up.

    This use has utterly swamped the other meaning of "to meet" when it's used for airport (train station, bus depot) pickups. If you want to say that you made someone acquaintance for the first time at an airport, you have to add some disambiguation.

    "I met my wife at the airport" means that you went there as planned and retrieved her after her flight.

    If you want to say that the first time you ever laid eyes on her was in an airport, you'd have to say something extra:
    - My wife and I met for the first time in the waiting area of Logan Airport.
    - I met the woman who would become my wife when we both tried to take the same bag off the carousel.
    - I met my wife for the very first time when we were socked in due to fog at JFK.
    How about using "she was made to meet"...?

    Sounds strange, but still, can that be correct?


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    #4

    Re: Is this sentence appropriate?

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    How about using "she was made to meet"...?

    Sounds strange, but still, can that be correct?
    This construction could possibly have a use.

    The boss orders his secretary to go to the airport and meet his biggest client. She is sore about it and sulks all day. At home that evening, her father cautions her brother not to annoy her.

    "She is tired this evening, so don't tease her. She was made to meet a boring old client at the airport today. Not only does she hate driving to the airport, but the client smoked a smelly cigar in her car."

    "She was made to meet" distinctly states that she was compelled to go meet someone.

  3. anupumh's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Is this sentence appropriate?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    This construction could possibly have a use.

    The boss orders his secretary to go to the airport and meet his biggest client. She is sore about it and sulks all day. At home that evening, her father cautions her brother not to annoy her.

    "She is tired this evening, so don't tease her. She was made to meet a boring old client at the airport today. Not only does she hate driving to the airport, but the client smoked a smelly cigar in her car."

    "She was made to meet" distinctly states that she was compelled to go meet someone.
    hmmm, I got your logic for "was met", but somehow have never heard it..

    Anyways

    Was met
    met
    made to meet

    what could be other variations to this..?

    And how will they different in terms of their usage and meaning?


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    #6

    Re: Is this sentence appropriate?

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    hmmm, I got your logic for "was met", but somehow have never heard it..

    Anyways

    Was met
    met
    made to meet

    what could be other variations to this..?

    And how will they different in terms of their usage and meaning?
    From the passenger's point of view:
    (passive voice)
    - I was met at the airport by my parents.
    - I was picked up at the train station by my brother.

    (active voice)
    - My parents met me at the airport when I flew home from the war.
    - My brother picked me up at the train station with some disturbing news.
    - My roommate got me at the bus station in the middle of the night.
    - Who's going to meet me at the station?
    - No one was there to meet him when he got off the train.

    From the driver's point of view:
    - I met my sister when she got off the plane from New York.
    - I have to go meet my parents at the airport this evening.
    - I'll pick you up at the train station at 3:15.
    - I'll get you at the Grayhound bus terminal when it pulls in to Chicago.


    The author on a book promotion tour sent an angry email to the publisher:
    I wasn't met at Albany and I wasn't met at Lewiston. I had better be met at Boston or I'm going home!

    The publisher writes back:
    You'll be met! Don't worry! I guarantee it! Someone from the Boston office will pick you up at South Station.

    She responds:
    If I'm not met at South Station -- without a wait! -- you can just cancel the rest of my book signings.

    He emails her back:
    You'll be picked up at the Commerce Street exit by Nancy from our Boston office.


    Here's a page of Google headlines that use the expression "to be met" in other contexts:
    to be met - Google Search

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Is this sentence appropriate?

    Simply being booked in Lewiston is good enough reason to cancel the rest of the tour...

    Unless she got free Moxie.


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    #8

    Re: Is this sentence appropriate?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Simply being booked in Lewiston is good enough reason to cancel the rest of the tour...

    Unless she got free Moxie.

    LOL! Yes, book-tour authors lead a proverbially miserable life.

    I'm not even sure that Moxie is enough to undo a Lewiston booking.

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