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      • Current Location:
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    #1

    affirmation of a few sentences 4

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am on the right track by the interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    The dog made an unsuccessful snap at the meat.
    snap (n) = a sudden attempt to bite, snatch, or grasp

    The dog snapped at my leg. (snap = try to snatch with the teeth)

    The fish snapped at the bait. (snap = sink o.’s teeth into; bite)

    They snapped at the offer. (offered eagerly to accept it)

    The cheapest articles were quickly snapped up. (snap up = snatch or grasp eagerly for one's own use)

    He stretched the rubber band till it snapped.
    The rope snapped. (snap = break, tear)

    I’m sorry I snapped at you just now. (snap = speak to somebody sharply)

    The sergeant snapped out a command.
    snap out = to utter abruptly or sharply

    Snap into it, you men, we haven't got time to waste!
    snap = to move swiftly

    The lid shut with a snap.
    Every minute or so I could hear a snap, a crack and a crash as another tree went down.
    snap (n) = a sudden sharp cracking sound or the action producing such a sound

    The cold snap killed everything in the garden.
    cold snap = sudden, short period of cold weather

    He is none of my friend. He has money and I have none.

    I’ll have none of it!

    I am none the better for it!

    When her husband died her friend came to commiserate with her over her loss.
    commiserate = compassionate; condole.

    They ran out of ready cash.
    We’re fast running out of beer.
    run out of = reach an end of (stocks, supplies)

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,131
    #2

    Re: affirmation of a few sentences 4

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am on the right track by the interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    The dog made an unsuccessful snap at the meat.
    snap (n) = a sudden attempt to bite, snatch, or grasp

    The dog snapped at my leg. (snap = try to snatch with the teeth)

    The fish snapped at the bait. (snap = sink o.s teeth into; bite)

    They snapped at the offer. (offered eagerly to accept it)

    The cheapest articles were quickly snapped up. (snap up = snatch or grasp eagerly for one's own use)

    He stretched the rubber band till it snapped.
    The rope snapped. (snap = break, tear)

    Im sorry I snapped at you just now. (snap = speak to somebody sharply)

    The sergeant snapped out a command.
    snap out = to utter abruptly or sharply

    Snap into it, you men, we haven't got time to waste!
    snap = to move swiftly

    The lid shut with a snap.
    Every minute or so I could hear a snap, a crack and a crash as another tree went down.
    snap (n) = a sudden sharp cracking sound or the action producing such a sound

    The cold snap killed everything in the garden.
    cold snap = sudden, short period of cold weather

    He is none of my friend. He has money and I have none.

    Ill have none of it!

    I am none the better for it!

    When her husband died her friend came to commiserate with her over her loss.
    commiserate = compassionate; condole.

    They ran out of ready cash.
    Were fast running out of beer.
    run out of = reach an end of (stocks, supplies)

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    These are excellent. Every use is perfectly understood.



    I didn't understand this part:

    He is none of my friend. He has money and I have none.

    Ill have none of it!

    I am none the better for it!

    You didn't seem to have any interpretation of them -- is that correct?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #3

    Re: affirmation of a few sentences 4

    Hi Ann1977,

    Thank you for your well-behaved backing.

    Here are my interpretations of the intangible phrases in bold from my previous post.

    He is none of my friend. He has money and I have none. (He is no friend of me…..)

    I’ll have none of it! (You can’t get away with me. That won’t go down with me. That cat won’t jump.)

    I am none the better for it! (Al those things are quite useless for me.)

    Will you have some more of the same kind?

    None of that now! (Enough of this! That will do! Stop it! No more of that!)

    He did it none too well.
    The pay is none too high.

    We saw none of the students whom we had discussed earlier.

    We drank none of the wine that you btought.

    The teacher said she would have none of Mike's arguing.

    When the fullback refused to obey the captain, the captain said he would have none of that.

    have none of that = phrasal to refuse to have anything to do with

    He has three daughters, none are/is married.
    none = nobody, nothing

    I slept none that night.
    none = in general

    The look he gave me was none too amiable.

    He was none too soon.

    They love each other none too well.

    He is none the worse for his experience.

    Any occupation is better than none at all.

    An ill opinion is worse than none at all.

    I like him none the less.

    Thank you again for your kindness.

    Regards,

    V.


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,131
    #4

    Re: affirmation of a few sentences 4

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Hi Ann1977,

    Thank you for your well-behaved backing.
    Why, thank you!


    Here are a couple of suggestions I had for some of these:

    He is none of my friend. He has money and I have none. (He is no friend of me..)
    This has nothing to do with money (unless you mean to show that he is so selfish that he must not be a friend.) It just means "He is no friend of mine. He is not a friend toward me. I don't consider him a friend."
    - This is no mere neutral statement of fact, either. It is a rejection of the person as a friend.

    I am none the better for it! (Al those things are quite useless for me.)
    This hasn't improved me in the least! In fact -- it made me worse!
    - The little boy ate 5 unripe apples, and he was none the better for it.
    - It didn't make him any better. It didn't improve him at all (because he got a stomach ache, say.)

    There is a similar expression: "I am none the wiser for it."
    - "The physics lecture was so confusing! I'm none the wiser for it."
    It means that I don't know anything more now than I did before. It didn't make me any wiser.

    Will you have some more of the same kind?
    This interpretation doesn't fit "none the better."

    He did it none too well.
    He didn't do it very well at all. He did poorly.
    The pay is none too high.
    It's far from being "too high!" It's low!

    We saw none of the students whom we had discussed earlier.
    - We saw not one of the students whom we had discussed earlier.
    - We didn't see even a single one of the students ...

    We drank none of the wine that you btought.
    - We didn't drink any.

    He has three daughters, none are/is married.
    none = nobody, nothing
    not even one

    I slept none that night.
    none = in general
    - I slept not at all that night.
    - I didn't sleep at all.


    The look he gave me was none too amiable.
    not amiable at all

    He was none too soon.
    not soon at all -- almost too late

    They love each other none too well.
    They don't love each well at all. They dislike each other.

    He is none the worse for his experience.
    not harmed
    This is like "none the better" (not improved).

    Any occupation is better than none at all.
    - Any occupation is better than no occupation at all.

    An ill opinion is worse than none at all.
    - It's worse than no opinion at all.

    I like him none the less.
    My liking for him did not decrease. It did not lessen.
    I like him just the same as before -- or even a little more.
    - The student leader stood up to the Administration in defense of the students' rights, and I like him none the less for his courage.

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