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    • Join Date: Feb 2009
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    #1

    is "for" necessary here?

    Teachers,

    Grammatically speaking, is "for" necessary in the following sentences?
     Where are you going for shopping?
     Where do you want to go for shopping?

    Or is it permissible to omit it and say like:
     Where are you going shopping?
     Where do you want to go shopping?

    Thank you.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: is "for" necessary here?

    Quote Originally Posted by bouji View Post
    Teachers,

    Grammatically speaking, is "for" necessary in the following sentences?
     Where are you going for shopping?
     Where do you want to go for shopping?

    Or is it permissible to omit it and say like:
     Where are you going shopping?
     Where do you want to go shopping?

    Thank you.
    "For" is not necessary, or natural.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #3

    Re: is "for" necessary here?

    Quote Originally Posted by bouji View Post
    Teachers,

    Grammatically speaking, is "for" necessary in the following sentences?
     Where are you going for shopping?
     Where do you want to go for shopping?

    Or is it permissible to omit it and say like:
     Where are you going shopping?
     Where do you want to go shopping?

    Thank you.
    Using "for" in these sentences is incorrect. We usually follow "for" with a gerund - ing form - when speaking of a consequence.

    Example:

    She got a $100 dollar ticket for speeding.

    The consequence can be positive as well.

    She got an invitation to the political forum for speaking up at the chamber of commerce networking meeting.

    We use for to indicate the purpose of things:

    This type of fishing rod is used for deep-sea fishing.

    Also, we use for to indicate that something has a purpose, is set a aside for a purpose, or is earmarked for a person or something specific. In this case, a noun or a noun phrase, but not a gerund - an ing form of a verb, follows "for". It's possible for a noun phrase to contain an ing form in this case.

    Example:

    The food at the receptionist's desk is for the meeting in conference room B at 10:00.

    We use the infinitive to express a person's purpose.

    We went to the mall to do some shopping. not; We went to the mall for doing some shopping.

    This makes the question, "Where are you going for shopping?" incorrect.

    We use a noun or a noun phrase after "for" to express a person's purpose, however.

    We could say, "Where do you want to go for lunch?" In this case, "for lunch" means "to eat lunch" or "for the purpose of eating lunch". I use the phrase "for the purpose of eating lunch" to explain the use of "for". It's not a phrase we really use. It's correct in a grammatical sense, but not at all very likely to be used as "real language".
    Last edited by PROESL; 16-Oct-2009 at 22:39.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #4

    Re: is "for" necessary here?

    Here is another way to follow "for" with an ing form:

    I would like to thank all of you for attending today's meeting.

    She was pleased with us for speaking up at the meeting.

    In these sentences, "for" is used to speak of the cause of a reaction.

    Here's another example.

    They were disappointed with them for not being more vocal at the meeting.

    They were rewarded for capturing the great white shark.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: is "for" necessary here?

    She got an international award for shopping till she dropped. She got a 10,000 dollar reward for information about his whereabouts.

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