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    • Join Date: Oct 2009
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    #1

    'wrong' 'false'

    what is the main difference between 'wrong' and 'false'. The problem is how can we explain this to the students?

  1. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: 'wrong' 'false'

    Wrong is Anglo-Saxon, false is French (fausse).

    Wrong is a bad choice, morally bad, geographically bad, etc.

    False is epistemologically incorrect (not true), logically incorrect, etc.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: 'wrong' 'false'

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    Wrong is Anglo-Saxon, false is French (fausse).

    Wrong is a bad choice, morally bad, geographically bad, etc.

    False is epistemologically incorrect (not true), logically incorrect, etc.
    I agree with these definitions, but you need to remember also that Anglo-Saxon words are often felt to be more rough/basic than the more smooth and abstract French-derived equivalents; and this feeling has been involved in choosing some idiomatic uses. So a criminal speaking Br English might say 'One false move and I shoot'; I'm sure I've come across the phrase 'wrong move' in this context in the work of an American writer - Raymond Chandler?

    b

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: 'wrong' 'false'

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I agree with these definitions, but you need to remember also that Anglo-Saxon words are often felt to be more rough/basic than the more smooth and abstract French-derived equivalents; and this feeling has been involved in choosing some idiomatic uses. So a criminal speaking Br English might say 'One false move and I shoot'; I'm sure I've come across the phrase 'wrong move' in this context in the work of an American writer - Raymond Chandler?

    b
    I think that a lot of American English derives from 17th century English, before the large scale "latinisation" of the 18th century.

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