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      • Native Language:
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      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
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    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #1

    shortlisted/totally snowed under/golden handshake/beating/take over/

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am on the right track by the interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    I've been shortlisted.

    shortlist = put someone or something on a short list

    I'd love to but I'm totally snowed under at the moment!

    totally snowed under = overburden with work

    She's set up a new company with her golden handshake.

    golden handshake = a lucrative severance agreement offered to an employee typically as an inducement to retire

    The restless beating of the barren, bitter sea.

    The joyful beating of the drum.

    beating = an act of repeated hitting or striking

    Our team had beating, but not a bad beating.

    The boy was given a sound beating.

    We gave the enemy a good beating.

    beating = a sound defeat

    had beating = sustained a loss

    He expects to take over the business when his father retires.

    take over = to take control or possession of

    The airplane pilot fainted and his co-pilot had to take over.

    take over = to take charge or responsibility

    The Japanese have taken over many European ways of life.

    take over = to borrow, imitate, or adopt.

    He has to take over the office (of mayor).

    I have to take over the liabilities of the firm.

    They haveto take over the watch.

    take over the watch = mount look out

    He has to take over the task of editing the book.

    He has taken over from his father this rare gift.

    take over = inherit, derive

    He was taken over in a boat.

    take over = ferry, convey

    I'll take you over in the car.

    take over = cart away

    We are taking you over to Rome.

    take over = put through (by phone)

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Oriya
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 2,121
    #2

    Exclamation Re: shortlisted/totally snowed under/golden handshake/beating/take over/

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am on the right track by the interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?
    I've been shortlisted.

    shortlist = put someone or something on a short list
    =A list of preferable items or candidates that have been selected for final consideration, as in making an award or filling a position.

    I'd love to but I'm totally snowed under at the moment!
    =Thnks, but I am really busy just now.

    totally snowed under = overburden with work
    She's set up a new company with her golden handshake.

    golden handshake = a lucrative severance agreement offered to an employee typically as an inducement to retire,
    This can be in the form of cash, equity, and other benefits,

    The restless beating of the barren, bitter sea.

    The joyful beating of the drum.
    = Harmonic resulting in segments of louder, and then quieter, sound.
    beating = an act of repeated hitting or striking
    = An act of repeated hitting or striking.
    2..
    Our team had beating (lost the match), but not a bad beating.

    The boy was given a sound beating.

    We gave the enemy a good beating.
    =A sound defeat

    beating = a sound defeat

    had beating = sustained a loss

    He expects to take over the business when his father retires.

    take over = to take control or possession of
    Ok

    The airplane pilot fainted and his co-pilot had to take over.

    take over = to take charge or responsibility
    Ok

    The Japanese have taken over many European ways of life.

    take over = to borrow, imitate, or adopt.
    I have not come across such use.

    He has to take over the office (of mayor).
    Ok

    I have to take over the liabilities of the firm.
    = the responsibility to clear the liabilities.

    They have to take over the watch.

    take over the watch = mount look out
    No idea

    He has to take over the task of editing the book.
    Ok

    He has taken over from his father this rare gift.
    Ok

    take over = inherit, derive

    He was taken over in a boat.
    May be colloquial

    take over = ferry, convey

    I'll take you over in the car.
    May be colloquial

    take over = cart away

    We are taking you over to Rome.
    Ok

    take over = put through (by phone)


    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    In business take over is commonly used. A takeover is the purchase of one company (the target) by another (the acquirer, or bidder). The term also refers to the acquisition of a public company whose shares are listed on a stock exchange, in contrast to the acquisition of a private company. In general it means: to assume control of or responsibility for something. Other than these, the rest are either informal or colloquial.

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