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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    "freely fodder"

    Please advise whether, and if so how, the following sentence is grammatically flawed. I was told that the adverb "freely" could not precede the noun "fodder" in such a way.

    "The episode is now more freely fodder for publication."

    I assume it would be correct to write, "the episode is now more freely available as fodder for publication". Why is it incorrect to shorten this to "freely fodder"?

    Cheers.

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    #2

    Re: "freely fodder"

    My suggestion is that it is simply awkward. The translation you suggested is clearer. The original makes me stop and question what you mean. I think that even if it is "correct" (which I suspect it may be), it is awkward. So why do it?

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    #3

    Re: "freely fodder"

    Please note I'm not a teacher nor a native speaker.

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    Please advise whether, and if so how, the following sentence is grammatically flawed. I was told that the adverb "freely" could not precede the noun "fodder" in such a way.

    "The episode is now more freely fodder for publication."
    If I'm not wrong the word fodder in your sentence is used as a verb.


    I assume it would be correct to write, "the episode is now more freely available as fodder for publication". Why is it incorrect to shorten this to "freely fodder"?
    If I have a good understanding of the phrase "More freely available" it means that there are fewer restrictions to get/give something.

    Cheers.
    The non literal meaning of "being fodder" or "fodder for" come from cannon fodder with means: soldiers who are regarded as expendable in the face of artillery fire.
    It's expendable there is no value attached to it.
    The phrase freely fodder sounds to me like a repetition.

    Cheers,

  2. Soup's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "freely fodder"

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    I was told that the adverb "freely" could not precede the noun "fodder" in such a way.
    Correct. The reason being, adverbs modify verbs and adjectives; Adjectives modify nouns:

    Noun: freely fodder
    Adjective: freely available

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "freely fodder"

    "The episode is now, more freely, fodder for publication."

    If you punctuate it as above, it is easier to understand, but "...more freely available..." is better.

  4. Soup's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "freely fodder"

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    "The episode is now, more freely, fodder for publication."

    If you punctuate it as above, it is easier to understand, but "...more freely available..." is better.
    Good eye. (I'm not sure of its intended meaning though.)

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