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    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #1

    Smile ask

    1) People began to ask for Stroud's release.
    2) People began to ask Stroud's release.

    What is the difference between two sentences?
    Are they different or same?
    Are both grammatically correct?

    Thanks for reading.

  1. Huda-M's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: ask

    First of all, is Stroud any singer???

    If so, I think the first sentence is grammatically correct.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #3

    Re: ask

    :)
    Robert Stroud.
    He is one of the most famous American criminals.

  2. Huda-M's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: ask

    Ouch...!
    Sorry! I thought he was a singer, realeasing any album...!

  3. Soup's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: ask

    Hello planet

    1) People began to ask for Stroud's release.
    2) People began to ask Stroud's release.
    3) People began to ask Stroud to do something.


    The verb phrase is ask (<someone>) for <something>.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #6

    Re: ask

    Soup, Can I ask you the reason?
    I saw the example, 'Why don't you ask his advice?' in the Oxford dictionary.
    Can you tell me why this sentence doesn't have 'for'?

  4. Soup's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: ask

    Quote Originally Posted by planet View Post
    Soup, Can I ask you the reason?
    I saw the example, 'Why don't you ask his advice?' in the Oxford dictionary.
    Can you tell me why this sentence doesn't have 'for'?
    Always look for what is not there:


    • ask (him for) his advice <same person>
    • ask (someone else) for Stroud's release <different>


    • Join Date: Dec 2007
    • Posts: 1
    #8

    Re: ask

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Always look for what is not there:


    • ask (him for) his advice <same person>
    • ask (someone else) for Stroud's release <different>
    hi everybody;
    im really confused abt the use of the modal"must" in its past form.
    must is used for expressing obligations, it has approximatly d same meaning as "have to"
    however mustn't is diffrent from don't have to.
    SO wat abt the simple past negative
    Do WE EXPRESS negative PAST OBLIGATIONS WITH didn't have to ????


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