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      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
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      • China
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    • Posts: 468
    #1

    keen learner

    Hi,teachers.
    I've got something very embarrassing. In my letter to my American friend last week, when I was talking about teachers never stopping learning themselves, I wrote, "It is even more important for teachers to set a good example for their students and convey the message to them that their teachers remain keen learners of English, even though they are much older than them." My American friend, having offered to revise my letter, changed the underlined part to "continue to be ardent/ diligent learners of English". She explained that she does not hear "keen learner" very often and she guessed that the term may be more commonly used in the UK. Afterwards, I googled this term and found so many search results, some of which are articles by native speakers. I said this to her in my next letter. But she remarked, "...you seem to be not realizing that google does not turn up only what is correct, but all that's out there... and, sad to say, most people do not write English very well at all." At this remark of hers, I got perplexed about the expression "keen learner (of English)", which I have used for a long time and which turns out to be wrong.
    I would like to have your views on this issue. Please tell me, Is there anything wrong with "a keen learner of English"?
    Thanks.
    Richard
    Last edited by ohmyrichard; 19-Oct-2009 at 15:22.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,615
    #2

    Re: keen learner

    Quote Originally Posted by ohmyrichard View Post
    Hi,teachers.
    I've got something very embarrassing. In my letter to my American friend last week, when I was talking about teachers never stopping learning themselves, I wrote, "It is even more important for teachers to set a good example for their students and convey the message to them that their teachers remain keen learners of English, even though they are much older than them." My American friend, having offered to revise my letter, changed the underlined part to "continue to be ardent/ diligent learners of English". She explained that she does not hear "keen learner" very often and she guessed that the term may be more commonly used in the UK. Afterwards, I googled this term and found so many search results, some of which are articles by native speakers. I said this to her in my next letter. But she remarked, "...you seem to be not realizing that google does not turn up only what is correct, but all that's out there... and, sad to say, most people do not write English very well at all." At this remark of hers, I got perplexed about the expression "keen learner (of English)", which I have used for a long time and which turns out to be wrong.
    I would like to have your views on this issue. Please tell me, Is there anything wrong with "a keen learner of English"?
    Thanks.
    Richard
    In my view there is nothing wrong with "keen learner".

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
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    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 468
    #3

    Re: keen learner

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    In my view there is nothing wrong with "keen learner".
    Thanks. I know that everyone, native or nonnative, will have no difficulty understanding its meaning. But the question is, do you native speakers use it in your speech and writing?

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
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      • England
      • Current Location:
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    #4

    Re: keen learner

    Quote Originally Posted by ohmyrichard View Post
    Thanks. I know that everyone, native or nonnative, will have no difficulty understanding its meaning. But the question is, do you native speakers use it in your speech and writing?
    I have used it.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
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      • Current Location:
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    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 468
    #5

    Re: keen learner

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I have used it.
    Please tell me whether there are other alternatives which sound more natural to you native speakers of English.
    Thanks.
    Richard

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