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    • Join Date: Oct 2009
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    #1

    Poetry Analysis

    I was wondering if I could get a kickstart on my assignment on comparative poetry analysis. (:

    The two poems I chose are:


    • Patrick Kavanagh's 'Inniskeen Road: July Evening'
    • Michael Longley's 'The Beech Tree'

    I wish to comment on technical features such as form, syntax, rhythm, tone, diction, imagery, voice and rhyme. Any help would be appreciated. (:

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Poetry Analysis

    Quote Originally Posted by LettyCakes View Post
    I was wondering if I could get a kickstart on my assignment on comparative poetry analysis. (:

    The two poems I chose are:


    • Patrick Kavanagh's 'Inniskeen Road: July Evening'
    • Michael Longley's 'The Beech Tree'

    I wish to comment on technical features such as form, syntax, rhythm, tone, diction, imagery, voice and rhyme. Any help would be appreciated. (:
    You need to do this:
    1. Read the poems
    2. Make notes on the technical features such as form, syntax, rhythm, tone, diction, imagery, voice and rhyme of each poem.
    3. Compare them.

    Once you've done that, you can post your ideas here, and someone might be able to help you.


    • Join Date: Oct 2009
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    #3

    Re: Poetry Analysis

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    You need to do this:
    1. Read the poems
    2. Make notes on the technical features such as form, syntax, rhythm, tone, diction, imagery, voice and rhyme of each poem.
    3. Compare them.

    Once you've done that, you can post your ideas here, and someone might be able to help you.
    1. I've read them.
    2. I've made notes.
    3. Was getting to that with my essay plan.

    I was wondering if people would mention things that I haven't thought of before, but I didn't realise I had to post everything up just to get some help. I appreciate the constructive criticism on how I handled that first post though.


    • I was thinking they are both sonnets, though I'm not particularly sure on this. Form is one of the features of a poem that stumps me.
    • Both of the poets' syntax is very lyrical, which invokes personal feelings from the listener/reader. Kavanagh makes up his own words to perhaps convey new thoughts and emotions.
    • The tone for both poems in my opinion is a lonely, longing feeling. Do they resent being a poet? Or are they nostalgic? 'I have what every poet hates in spite/Of all the solemn talk of contemplation.' - Kavanagh. 'And the poet who recollects his younger self' - Longely. There is many tones in both these poems ranging from content nostalgia, to loneliness, to content euphoria, etc
    • Diction for Kavanagh's poem is quite colloquial, as if he is addressing the reader in a intimate manner. Longley seperates himself from the reader with his syntax and lexicon as he isn't using conversational intonation like Kavanagh is. But are they all semantics? Does his tone change the meaning of his seperation from the reader?

    I haven't got many ideas on rhythm, voice or rhyme, so is it possible I could be given some hints or a starting point so I can find some more on my own?

    Much appreciated. (:

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    #4

    Re: Poetry Analysis

    Quote Originally Posted by LettyCakes View Post
    I was wondering if people would mention things that I haven't thought of before, but I didn't realise I had to post everything up just to get some help. I appreciate the constructive criticism on how I handled that first post though.

    Well, we only know what you need help with if you tell us what you've done, and what you are having trouble doing.


    • I was thinking they are both sonnets, though I'm not particularly sure on this. Form is one of the features of a poem that stumps me.

    If they each have 14 lines, and start rhyming abab, and the rhythm is iambic pentameter, they could be sonnets.
    ('Inniskeen Road: July Evening' is a sonnet. I can't find the other one.)

    • Both of the poets' syntax is very lyrical, which invokes personal feelings from the listener/reader. Kavanagh makes up his own words to perhaps convey new thoughts and emotions.

    I can't find any made-up words in Inniskeen Road. There are some strangely hyphenated ones.

    • The tone for both poems in my opinion is a lonely, longing feeling. Do they resent being a poet? Or are they nostalgic? 'I have what every poet hates in spite/Of all the solemn talk of contemplation.' - Kavanagh. 'And the poet who recollects his younger self' - Longely. There is many tones in both these poems ranging from content nostalgia, to loneliness, to content euphoria, etc
    • Diction for Kavanagh's poem is quite colloquial, as if he is addressing the reader in a intimate manner. Longley seperates himself from the reader with his syntax and lexicon as he isn't using conversational intonation like Kavanagh is. But are they all semantics? Does his tone change the meaning of his seperation from the reader?

    I haven't got many ideas on rhythm, voice or rhyme, so is it possible I could be given some hints or a starting point so I can find some more on my own?
    If the are both sonnets, they should have a certain rhyme scheme, and usually the rhythm is iambic pentameter. There are two types of sonnets, Petrarchan and Shakespearean.
    Are you saying you can't find a rhyme scheme in
    'Inniskeen Road'?
    Are the poems in the first person or third person (or less likely, the second person)
    I have what every poet hates in spite That's iambic pentameter. Much appreciated. (:
    R.


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    #5

    Re: Poetry Analysis

    I'm sorry, I should have posted the poems on here, in case you couldn't find it. ):

    The Beech Tree

    Leaning back like a lover against this beech tree’s
    Two-hundred-year-old pewter trunk, I look up
    Through skylights into the leafy cumulus, and join
    Everybody who has teetered where these huge roots
    Spread far and wide their motionless mossy dance,
    As though I’d begun my eclogues with a beech
    As Virgil does, the brown envelopes unfolding
    Like fans their transparent downy leaves, tassels
    And prickly cups, mast, a fall of vermilion
    And copper and gold, then room in the branches
    For the full moon and her dusty lakes, winter
    And the poet who recollects his younger self
    And improvises a last line for the georgics
    About snoozing under this beech tree’s canopy.

    Michael Longley.


    The hyphenated words are the words I was naming 'made up'. He created new compound words is what I meant, sorry.

    I can see the rhyme scheme in 'Inniskeen Road' which is abab abab ababcc. Though I can't see a rhyme scheme in 'The Beech Tree' it does have 14 lines, does this mean it isn't a sonnet? =/
    Could I mention anything on stanzaic form aswell?

    Both poems are in first person.

    I know 'Inniskeen Road' was in iamb, though I was thinking 'The Beech Tree' was possibly in trochee. I tried working out the poetic foot by scansion but I just ended up confusing myself which isn't very good. =S

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    #6

    Re: Poetry Analysis

    Quote Originally Posted by LettyCakes View Post
    I'm sorry, I should have posted the poems on here, in case you couldn't find it. ):

    The Beech Tree

    Leaning back like a lover against this beech tree’s
    Two-hundred-year-old pewter trunk, I look up
    Through skylights into the leafy cumulus, and join
    Everybody who has teetered where these huge roots
    Spread far and wide their motionless mossy dance,
    As though I’d begun my eclogues with a beech
    As Virgil does, the brown envelopes unfolding
    Like fans their transparent downy leaves, tassels
    And prickly cups, mast, a fall of vermilion
    And copper and gold, then room in the branches
    For the full moon and her dusty lakes, winter
    And the poet who recollects his younger self
    And improvises a last line for the georgics
    About snoozing under this beech tree’s canopy.

    Michael Longley.


    The hyphenated words are the words I was naming 'made up'. He created new compound words is what I meant, sorry.

    I can see the rhyme scheme in 'Inniskeen Road' which is abab abab ababcc. Though I can't see a rhyme scheme in 'The Beech Tree' it does have 14 lines, does this mean it isn't a sonnet? =/
    Could I mention anything on stanzaic form aswell?
    Why not?
    Both poems are in first person.

    I know 'Inniskeen Road' was in iamb, though I was thinking 'The Beech Tree' was possibly in trochee. I tried working out the poetic foot by scansion but I just ended up confusing myself which isn't very good.
    If you can't find a definitive rhythm scheme in this one, then maybe that's a comparison that can be made.

    =S
    It sounds to me like you know enough to do this assignment all by yourself.



    • Join Date: Oct 2009
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    #7

    Re: Poetry Analysis

    Haha, well thanks for you help anyways! Definately cleared up a few things for me as I have my weak points in stuff like this. (:

    Letty

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