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    #1

    Question using the apostophe in names that end in s

    I would like you to clear this up for me, please. I've always thought that is a name ends with a s then the apostrophe follows the s. Ex. Carlos' birthday


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    #2

    Re: using the apostophe in names that end in s

    Quote Originally Posted by billie tisdell gonzalez View Post
    I would like you to clear this up for me, please. I've always thought that is a name ends with a s then the apostrophe follows the s. Ex. Carlos' birthday
    We don't go by that any more. Just use < 's > as you would for any other name.

    Example:
    Frank's house
    James's house
    Carlos's birthday

    Exception:
    Some traditional expressions still retain the "apostrophe only" form
    - For Jesus' sake

    If Microsoft puts a wavy red line under it, that is not because Microsoft thinks it's wrong. It's because Microsoft didn't include it in its dictionary, like many other plurals and possessives. Just click "Add to dictionary" to solve the problem.

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    #3

    Re: using the apostophe in names that end in s

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    We don't go by that any more. Just use < 's > as you would for any other name.
    That means the version with ...s's is completely correct, even preferred above the ...s' ? Also in official written communication?


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    #4

    Re: using the apostophe in names that end in s

    Quote Originally Posted by TomKQT View Post
    That means the version with ...s's is completely correct, even preferred above the ...s' ? Also in official written communication?
    Yes, that is what it means.

    The New York Times editorial pages would write:
    "Prince Charles's interest in ecology ...."

    The usage "Prince Charles' interest in ecology . . ." looks old-fashioned and pretentious now.

    I'm not sure what you mean by "official written communication."

    If you mean "the government," there is no accounting for what the government writes, and generally no excuse either. Government publications are always somewhat in the nature of loose cannons shooting mystery messages at random.

    Harvard University would write:
    "We are pleased to announce the publication of Dean Jones's fifth book."


    There is some tendency to avoid the < 's > when the name which ends is s is already so long (or so full of consonants) that adding another syllable just for the sake of the apostrophe seems a little too unwieldy:
    "The Department of Antropology announces Professor Jonathan Brothers' lecture series..."

    This choice is likely when "Professor Jonathan Brothers's lecture series" seems just a little too much of a mouthful. But < 's > is not ever wrong, and it appears -- even though it's a mouthful -- in writing and speaking all the time.
    Last edited by Ann1977; 24-Oct-2009 at 19:17.

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    #5

    Re: using the apostophe in names that end in s

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    Yes, that is what it means.

    The New York Times editorial pages would write:
    "Prince Charles's interest in ecology ...."

    The usage "Prince Charles' interest in ecology . . ." looks old-fashioned and pretentious now.
    Beware of American English.


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    #6

    Re: using the apostophe in names that end in s

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Beware of American English.
    Yes, I was hoping the asker could hear a variety of opinions on this topic.

    Do the British still say "Mrs Jones' cat was rescued from a tree"?

    Hahahaha!

    No, wait. Did I laugh? No, I meant, "How quaint!"
    -------------------------------------

    But seriously, how would that be pronounced? How do you pronounce "Carlos' book"?

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    #7

    Re: using the apostophe in names that end in s

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    Yes, I was hoping the asker could hear a variety of opinions on this topic.

    Do the British still say "Mrs Jones' cat was rescued from a tree"?

    Hahahaha!

    No, wait. Did I laugh? No, I meant, "How quaint!"
    -------------------------------------

    But seriously, how would that be pronounced? How do you pronounce "Carlos' book"?
    It is pronounced Carlos book. How did you think it would be pronounced?


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    #8

    Re: using the apostophe in names that end in s

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    It is pronounced Carlos book. How did you think it would be pronounced?
    It looks like you can't distinguish between Carlo's book and Carlos' book.

    I speculate that the use of "apostrophe s" followed the pronunciation. I think saying "Mr. Jones's proteges" preceded writing it.

    Personnel: Mr. Jones's Proteges - TIME

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    #9

    Re: using the apostophe in names that end in s

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    It looks like you can't distinguish between Carlo's book and Carlos' book.
    With "Carlo's book" the "o" is pronounced as in "coat". With "Carlos' book" the "o" is pronounced as in "cot".

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    #10

    Re: using the apostophe in names that end in s

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post

    I'm not sure what you mean by "official written communication."

    If you mean "the government,"
    I just meant something like bussiness letters, publications, newspapers, technical articles etc.
    But I already got my answer ;)

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