Results 1 to 9 of 9

    • Join Date: Feb 2009
    • Posts: 101
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    How do they differ?

    I have a pain in my stomach.
    I have pain in my stomach.

    Can anyone please tell me how these two sentences differ in meaning?
    I'm quite confused.

    Thank you.

  1. anupumh's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,110
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: How do they differ?

    Quote Originally Posted by bouji View Post
    I have a pain in my stomach.
    I have pain in my stomach.

    Can anyone please tell me how these two sentences differ in meaning?
    I'm quite confused.

    Thank you.
    Your sentences sound little awkward.
    I doubt they mean different things, may be you will have to look into the exact context..
    I feel a better sentence to convey your thought would be..
    My stomach is paining.
    or
    I have a stomachache.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 23,270
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: How do they differ?

    Quote Originally Posted by bouji View Post
    I have a pain in my stomach.
    I have pain in my stomach.

    Can anyone please tell me how these two sentences differ in meaning?
    I'm quite confused.

    Thank you.
    Both sentences are normal. You could say either.
    The differences are subtle.

  3. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,035
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: How do they differ?

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Your sentences sound little awkward.
    I doubt they mean different things, may be you will have to look into the exact context..
    I feel a better sentence to convey your thought would be..
    My stomach is paining.
    ...
    Perhaps that works in Indian English, but in Br English 'pain' is less common as a verb - being most common in the impersonal 'It pains me to have to say this, but <painful-thing>.

    As Raymott said, both the OP's sentences are perfectly acceptable, though their meanings are subtly different.

    b

  4. anupumh's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,110
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: How do they differ?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Perhaps that works in Indian English, but in Br English 'pain' is less common as a verb - being most common in the impersonal 'It pains me to have to say this, but <painful-thing>.

    As Raymott said, both the OP's sentences are perfectly acceptable, though their meanings are subtly different.

    b
    Is pain countable?
    Can we say this: I have 2 pains in my stomach?

  5. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 23,270
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: How do they differ?

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Is pain countable?
    Can we say this: I have 2 pains in my stomach?
    Yes, you can. In appendicitis it's very common to have a vague diffuse abdominal pain all over, and a specific localised pain in the lower right quadrant. (Assuming by 'stomach' we mean 'abdomen', which I think is a fairly standard usage).
    Differentiating two pains in the actual stomach might be difficult, but it's possible.

  6. anupumh's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,110
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: How do they differ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Yes, you can. In appendicitis it's very common to have a vague diffuse abdominal pain all over, and a specific localised pain in the lower right quadrant. (Assuming by 'stomach' we mean 'abdomen', which I think is a fairly standard usage).
    Differentiating two pains in the actual stomach might be difficult, but it's possible.
    Alright, however I have never read any statement describing two pains anywhere in the body. in fact i have never read the usage of plural of pain "pains". Though as you are sying it surely might exist..

  7. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 23,270
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #8

    Re: How do they differ?

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Alright, however I have never read any statement describing two pains anywhere in the body. in fact i have never read the usage of plural of pain "pains". Though as you are saying it surely might exist..
    No, I am saying it definitely does exist. I didn't work as a medical doctor for 23 years not to know that you can have two simultaneous pains in the abdomen. I can say that many times I wished it didn't exist, but it does.

    It would be very handy though not to be able to have two pains at once.
    If you could only have one pain at a time, and you came to see me with a fractured leg, I could make that pain disappear immediately by hitting your thumb with a hammer.

  8. anupumh's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,110
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #9

    Re: How do they differ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    No, I am saying it definitely does exist. I didn't work as a medical doctor for 23 years not to know that you can have two simultaneous pains in the abdomen. I can say that many times I wished it didn't exist, but it does.

    It would be very handy though not to be able to have two pains at once.
    If you could only have one pain at a time, and you came to see me with a fractured leg, I could make that pain disappear immediately by hitting your thumb with a hammer.
    LOL.. On the biological front, I perfectly agree with you Raymott, I also hail from a Biology background and hold a PhD working in the field of Behavioral Pharmacology.

    Its just that I have not heard such a sentence construction out here in India. An indian speaker will perhaps prefer the other statements which I had posted out there in my first reply.

Similar Threads

  1. 'beg to differ'
    By Agnes in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 27-Apr-2008, 18:36
  2. I beg to differ
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 24-Jan-2008, 12:01
  3. Differ
    By kahhong in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 23-Apr-2006, 17:04
  4. Differ 2
    By kahhong in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-Apr-2006, 06:03
  5. Differ
    By kahhong in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Apr-2006, 11:41

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •