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    • Join Date: May 2009
    • Posts: 19
    #1

    Question Please help me with these sentences

    Dear Teacher,

    Please help me with the following sentence structure.

    1. He is fond of cars.
    2. He is afraid of jumping.

    I think in above sentences
    the underlined words are adjectives which are subject complements (Please correct me if I am wrong).
    What are the phrases "of cars" and "of jumping" doing in the sentences? Means, which words are those phrases modifying?
    If those phrases are adverbs and modifying adjective "fond" and "afraid", how can we form questions for those adverb phrases by using adverb question words?

    Thanks a lot in advance.
    Sandyy


    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 248
    #2

    Re: Please help me with these sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by sandyy View Post
    Dear Teacher,

    Please help me with the following sentence structure.

    1. He is fond of cars.
    2. He is afraid of jumping.

    I think in above sentences
    the underlined words are adjectives which are subject complements (Please correct me if I am wrong).
    What are the phrases "of cars" and "of jumping" doing in the sentences? Means, which words are those phrases modifying?
    If those phrases are adverbs and modifying adjective "fond" and "afraid", how can we form questions for those adverb phrases by using adverb question words?

    Thanks a lot in advance.
    Sandyy
    Yes, "fond" and "afraid" are adjectives. "fond of cars" is an adjective phrase that modifies "he" after the copula "is" and consists of the adjective "fond" and the prepositional phrase "of cars. " "to be fond of [something/someone]" means "to like [something/someone]", and "of cars" is the prepositional-phrase complement that specifies something that "he," [the subject], likes.

    "to be afraid of [something/someone" means "to fear something/someone]". Can you analyze "to be afraid of jumping" yourself?


    • Join Date: May 2009
    • Posts: 19
    #3

    Re: Please help me with these sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by gabber View Post
    Yes, "fond" and "afraid" are adjectives. "fond of cars" is an adjective phrase that modifies "he" after the copula "is" and consists of the adjective "fond" and the prepositional phrase "of cars. " "to be fond of [something/someone]" means "to like [something/someone]", and "of cars" is the prepositional-phrase complement that specifies something that "he," [the subject], likes.

    "to be afraid of [something/someone" means "to fear something/someone]". Can you analyze "to be afraid of jumping" yourself?


    Thank you for your response. Are prepositional phrases "of cars" and "of jumping" acting as adverbs which modify "fond" and "afraid".


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    #4

    Re: Please help me with these sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by sandyy View Post
    Dear Teacher,

    Please help me with the following sentence structure.

    1. He is fond of cars.
    2. He is afraid of jumping.

    I think in above sentences
    the underlined words are adjectives which are subject complements (Please correct me if I am wrong).
    You are wrong, in my opinion. They are part of an AP. They are part of the predicate adjective. Adjectival phrases (AP) have a head (fond, afraid) and in these cases they are complemented by a prepositional phrase in the adjectival phrase. '(O)f cars and 'of jumping' are restrictive prep phrases that limit the scope of the corresponding adjective. Therefore they function as adverbs, in my opinion.

    EDIT: When I opened this thread to post my answer, there was no comment on the OP's question yet. And now I see there are. But how? Seeing the times of posting...


    • Join Date: May 2009
    • Posts: 19
    #5

    Re: Please help me with these sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by svartnik View Post
    You are wrong, in my opinion. They are part of an AP. They are part of the predicate adjective. Adjectival phrases (AP) have a head (fond, afraid) and in these cases they are complemented by a prepositional phrase in the adjectival phrase. '(O)f cars and 'of jumping' are restrictive prep phrases that limit the scope of the corresponding adjective. Therefore they function as adverbs, in my opinion.

    EDIT: When I opened this thread to post my answer, there was no comment on the OP's question yet. And now I see there are. But how? Seeing the times of posting...


    Hello Svartnik, thank you so much for your response but I didn't understand the edited message posted by you.

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