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    #1

    it

    I would like to know which is correct.
    1. Life is too important to waste feeling sorry for yourself.
    2. Life is too important to waste it feeling sorry for yourself.


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
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    #2

    Re: it

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I would like to know which is correct.
    1. Life is too important to waste feeling sorry for yourself.
    2. Life is too important to waste it feeling sorry for yourself.
    1.
    2.

    Life is too important to waste it by immersing yourself in your own self-pity.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: it

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I would like to know which is correct.
    1. Life is too important to waste feeling sorry for yourself.
    2. Life is too important to waste it feeling sorry for yourself.
    They are both correct.

    Similar correct sentences:
    1. Ice cream is too fattening to eat every day.
    2. Ice cream is too fattening to eat it every day.

    The difference is probably not worth worrying about. There will be some obscure grammatical justification for it. Maybe svartnik could solve it?


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    #4

    Re: it

    1. (Life is too important to waste) feeling sorry for yourself.
    2. (Life is too important to waste it) feeling sorry for yourself.

    Participles in adverbial function are killing me. Yes indeed, on second reading the sentences seem correct to me.




    1. Ice cream is too fattening to eat every day .
    2. Ice cream is too fattening to eat it every day.
    Hello Ray,

    The infinitive (nominal) clauses in bold complement the predicate adjective phrase (too fattening).
    As I perceive it, when the object of the (transitive) verb in the infinitive clause refers to the referent of the subject in the sentence, we can drop the former.
    We need a Philo to confirm it.

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