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    #1

    Disenfranchise

    Dear Teachers,

    Two managing directors were discussing the merger of their companies. One proposed that they close down one of the business departments in the process and the other responded that he could not agree to that on the spot because that would, "disenfrachise the people in that department." What does "disenfranchise" mean in this context?


    Thank you.

    YY

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Disenfranchise

    Quote Originally Posted by Yuri Yoshikuni View Post
    Dear Teachers,

    Two managing directors were discussing the merger of their companies. One proposed that they close down one of the business departments in the process and the other responded that he could not agree to that on the spot because that would, "disenfrachise the people in that department." What does "disenfranchise" mean in this context?


    Thank you.

    YY
    disenfranchise:
    to take away power or opportunities, especially the right to vote, from a person or group - Cambridge.

    It's probably used incorrectly here since, in a business context, "the people in the department" (the employees), would not normally get a say on matters such as these.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Disenfranchise

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    disenfranchise:
    to take away power or opportunities, especially the right to vote, from a person or group - Cambridge.

    It's probably used incorrectly here since, in a business context, "the people in the department" (the employees), would not normally get a say on matters such as these.
    It almost seems to mean 'make them redundant' (which I suppose fits the Cambridge definition - it takes away their [job] opportunities). But it's stretching that meaning a bit.

    But, given the way 'franchise' is coming to be fixed in a single meaning, I wouldn't be surprised if 'disenfranchise' came to mean 'deprive of the option to eat at McDonalds' {students NB - for the time being this is not a serious suggestion}

    b

  3. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Disenfranchise

    I agree the CEO wouldn't be thinking about "employees," but a senior manager would likely wish to speak with the closing department's management-- business partners, vice presidents, etc. -- before making such a decision, so it seems possible to me.

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